Why a Y Axis?

As machine tool capabilities have advanced, many builders are offering Y-axis capabilities to turning centers and multitasking machines.

As machine tool capabilities have advanced, many builders are offering Y-axis capabilities to turning centers and multitasking machines. The question is, should you add Y axis to your options list?
 
Simply put, a Y axis eliminates a second operation by allowing simple milling/drilling/tapping right on a turning center that normally runs only in the same two axes of motion as the turning tools. The Y axis adds a third linear axis to the turning center turret, enabling rotary cutters to machine across the spindle center line.
 
By enhancing a turn-mill machine tool capability with a Y-axis turret, the machine can do work such as drill holes in the corners of a milled flat on a cylinder. It is not possible to have access to the corners of the flat without a Y axis.
 
If turning and then milling/drilling/tapping are operations your shop does regularly, and if small-lot products and efficient change-over/setup are key measures of profitability, delving into this technology will more than likely benefit your processes.
 

To read more about Y-axis technology, how it works and considerations prior to implementation, read “Why Y Axis for Turn-Mill Machines.”

Related Content

Robot-Fed Multitasking Lathe with Conveyor

This machine can run for a long time without any operator intervention, and users can machine finished parts from slug stock or cast blanks while achieving the same high productivity as if they were machining from barstock, the company says.