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Posted by: Peter Zelinski 25. August 2014

Video: Young People and Their Mentors Describe Manufacturing Careers

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Cutting tool supplier Widia and manufacturing media firm Creative Technology produced this video titled “Why Not Me?” to illustrate manufacturing careers, and to highlight young people who have chosen this work as well as their employers and teachers. The video visits various sites where manufacturing is either performed or taught, including Cardinal Manufacturing, Chippewa Valley Technical College, MRS Machining and Prototype Solutions Group. Carlos Cardoso, chairman, president and CEO of Kennametal Inc. - Widia Product Group, appears in the video to make the case for the value and opportunity of manufacturing careers.


Posted by: Mark Albert 22. August 2014

Prepare to Be Wowed

AMT’s Emerging Technology Center (ETC) at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) 2014 promises to “wow” visitors by giving them a glimpse of the most important “technologies of the future.”

“At IMTS 2004 we created the Emerging Technology Center to present manufacturing ‘technologies of the future’ from leading universities and government research labs,” Peter Eelman, Vice President – Exhibitions and Communications at AMT – The Association For Manufacturing Technology, recalls. “This feature returned IMTS to its roots as a forum where the latest technologies are first seen. This year is no exception, and we are confident that this will be the most exciting ETC effort yet.”

Eelman says the number one “wow” factor in the ETC will be the construction of a 3D-printed electric car by IMTS partner Local Motors. The car builders will start from scratch using direct digital manufacturing techniques and technology integration to make the parts and assemble the vehicle on site.

Also part of the ETC will be the Institutes for Manufacturing Innovation that make up the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation. They will show how regional hubs leverage public-private partnerships to strengthen the position of U.S. manufacturers. Each hub has a special focus, as presented at IMTS:

  • America Makes (additive manufacturing technologies)
  • Power America (energy efficiency)
  • Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute (reducing the time and cost of manufacturing)
  • American Lightweight Materials Manufacturing Innovation Institute (new alloys that cut weight and promote automation)

To learn more about the ETC at IMTS and to register, visit imts.com.  


Posted by: Emily Probst 21. August 2014

Addressing the Skills Gap

According to Roush Industries Operations Manager Mel Koslowski, one way to address the skills gap is to expose kids to programs in high school that will pique their interest in manufacturing careers. Roush is also investing in training its current employees to operate machines such as the Makino Machining Complex (MMC) cell above.
 

What matters most to Roush Industries is its people, so it bothers Operations Manager Mel Koslowski that in five to 10 years manufacturers are expected to experience a critical lack of skilled machinists. It is especially worrisome as the seasoned veterans who are currently leading companies begin to consider retirement.

“We definitely require high-tech machining systems like those from Makino for our production operations,” Mr. Koslowski says, “but we must also train people to use them. Even with automation, there will still be a need for a core group of people to engineer the parts, program and set up the machines to develop the prototypes that will eventually end up in production. We are seeing a growing gap between the availability of these jobs and the workers who possess these skills.”

Mr. Koslowski says that he has been to community colleges with impressive machine setups and great programs teaching the fundamentals of machining, but where these schools fall short is in recruiting high school students to join them. That is mostly because these days no industrial education courses are being taught in high schools—classes that traditionally piqued student’s interests and fed the career pipeline.

“Back in the day, I loved metal shop,” he says. “We learned the basics all through high school, and I really enjoyed that. It is the reason why I went into the machining industry. These days, high schools have closed their metal shops, so students have no idea that there’s another way to earn a living.”

Mr. Koslowski believes that there’s still a future in machining, and that students need to be informed of this—that they don’t necessarily have to go to college to be an administrator, businessperson or information technology professional.

“There are kids in this country that have natural talent with their hands,” he says. “They just need the exposure and to realize that these programs exist at their community colleges. They need to know that they could make a good living doing these types of jobs.”

In the meantime, Roush’s partnership with local schools and in developing its own training program has been successful, and Mr. Koslowski continues to challenge other industry leaders to help find a way to address the skills gap.


Posted by: Peter Zelinski 20. August 2014

Video: Racing Engine Oil Pump Gear Produced through Additive Manufacturing

Gears are expensive parts to make in small quantities. This video from 3D Systems describes how just one gear—for an oil pump—was critical to overcoming a problem with excessive oil pressure in a Mitsubishi 4G63 race engine for a car run at over 185 mph.

English Racing of Camas, Washington, knew that a change in gear size might solve the problem, but the team didn’t know how to get this gear. The complex custom part would have been costly to machine as a one-off job, particularly since one-off prototypes would also be needed to test and refine the design.

Metal Technology of Albany, Oregon, proposed additive manufacturing instead, growing the part directly from the CAD model on its ProX 300 direct metal sintering machine. This video shows the part not only being additively manufactured in this way, but also functioning successfully at full speed within the engine.


Posted by: Derek Korn 19. August 2014

Extreme Part-Off Demos at IMTS 2014

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Nothing beats a wild, live cutting demo on the floor of a trade show. Iscar will deliver this at IMTS in Booth W-1800 by bringing back an extreme, attention-getting part-off operation it first featured at IMTS 1994. Plus, it has added a second one that’s just as impressive, as you’ll see (and hear) in this video.

In 1976, Iscar released its Self-Grip part-off system and followed that up in 1993 with the upgraded Do-Grip system. The company says the Do-Grip featured a proprietary twisted design and was the first to enable a depth of cut deeper than the length of the insert. At IMTS 1994, the company demonstrated how this part-off system could perform under extreme conditions by chucking a railroad rail in a lathe and parting off slices of it throughout the show. The rail material is challenging to cut because it work hardens, the interruption is severe and the workpiece cross-sectional area varies, creating difficult cutting conditions that would cause most tools to fail. The Do-Grip tooling showed little sign of wear or damage.

Iscar revisits this live demo at this year’s IMTS, using its latest Tang-Grip part-off system. The company says Tang-Grip is a single-sided insert with a unique shape and pocketing technology to further improve insert security and tool rigidity yet maintain simplicity of use. In addition to the rail demo, this system also performs another challenging part-off demo using a sledge hammer head as the workpiece (this operation is performed at 350 sfm/0.004 ipr). Like the rail, the sledge hammer head material work hardens and the cut is interrupted. Plus, its hardness varies from 30 to 50 HRc.

These hourly demos are viewable on the large LED monitors in Iscar’s “Machining Intelligently” booth in the West Hall. Be sure to check out these impressive part-off operations for yourself if you’re coming to the show.


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