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Stephanie Monsanty

Stephanie Monsanty worked as a summer intern in 2012 and joined the Modern Machine Shop team as assistant editor later that fall. She edits product and industry news for the print magazine as well as MMS Online. Stephanie completed her M.A. in professional writing at the University of Cincinnati in 2013, and also holds a B.A. in English literature and history from the University of Mount Union.

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 5. August 2014

“Covering” the Metalworking Industry

Modern Machine Shop is sporting a new look this month, with a custom cover depicting the Chicago skyline foregrounded by the Cloud Gate (also known as “the Bean”) and IMTS balloon. Artist Charla Steele created the collage from magazine pieces that she tore out of past MMS issues and glued to a 40" × 58" canvas. Her goal was to produce a complete, whole image while still honoring its various parts, which are representative of the equipment, companies and industries we cover each month. “As readers explore its details, I hope they will gain a new appreciation for what’s in Modern Machine Shop each month,” she says of the collage, which will be displayed in the Gardner Business Media booth (W-10) at IMTS 2014, happening September 8-13 at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

Charla will also be creating another collage on-site at IMTS. Stop by Booth W-10 Monday through Thursday during the show for a firsthand look at her creative process. 

Charla layered more than 500 magazine pieces onto the canvas to create the cover image.

Read more about the MMS cover here, and view more of Charla’s artwork on her website.  

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 3. June 2014

Product Spotlight Slideshow: Micromachining

Unlike “turning” or “EDM,” there is no one process or type of equipment that defines “micromachining.” Instead, micromachining references the end result—the tiny workpiece or feature that is produced, regardless of how or with what that result was achieved. Therefore, our May product spotlight includes a variety of products ranging from a benchtop lathe to a wire EDM to a toolholder designed to clamp very small tools.

View the slideshow and visit the Micromachining Zone for more on the equipment used to make tiny parts. 

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 19. May 2014

Refueling Manufacturing Through Storytelling

Edge Factor, Purdue press conference

Edge Factor’s Jeremy Bout (lower right) speaks to students about the eduFactor project during Purdue’s MSTEM3 500 event, held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Speaking at a press conference at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway last week, "The Edge Factor Show" host and producer Jeremy Bout reiterated the buzz about job availability that permeates the manufacturing industry. But talk isn’t enough. For students hearing about these fabled jobs, Jeremy says, “The question is: How do they get there?”

A new partnership between Edge Factor and Purdue University seeks to answer that question for middle and high school students across North America. With the support of industry partners, including leading benefactor Mastercam, the Edge Factor and Purdue are creating a series of interconnected multimedia materials to educate students about manufacturing. The eduFactor resources will soon be available to schools, thanks to the MSTEM3 Grant Initiative funded by Mastercam and others.

In Stage 1 of the project, announced at the press conference, Purdue is developing educational materials for each of the existing episodes of "The Edge Factor Show" and new series "LaunchPoint." In Stage 2, Edge Factor will produce more media to align with the overall curriculum created by Purdue. Each episode will serve as the centerpiece for a particular lesson, whether it’s as immediate as “Why do we need to learn fractions?” or as broad as “What is manufacturing?”

The goal is both to inform and excite students about manufacturing careers. Curricula developed by Purdue are intended to educate students on what manufacturing is and how it works, while building a positive image of manufacturing careers. Edge Factor’s distinctive show episodes provide context to help the message hit home.

“Edge Factor is the best storyteller for this message,” says Danny White, manager of Purdue Motorsports and MSTEM3 at Purdue University. That’s because each episode of "The Edge Factor Show" and "LaunchPoint" features real people and situations that bring STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) concepts to life.

“The message of these videos is hope. It’s excitement. It’s advanced manufacturing. It’s real life!” says Jeremy. Bringing that link to the “real world” into the classroom may be the key to matching more students with manufacturing careers.

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 7. May 2014

Video: Leveraging Magnets for Robot Flexibility

Magnetic tooling for robotic arms can be a useful alternative to end-effectors such as vacuum cups and pneumatic grippers. Unlike these devices, magnets need not rely on a constant stream of electricity for holding power. Other benefits of magnets include their lack of moving parts and flexibility to accommodate different types of workpieces.

DocMagnet’s Pick and Place (PNP) magnetic end-effectors, for example, use electricity only to switch the magnet on and off for reliability in the event that power is interrupted. The lack of moving parts helps the system last longer with little to no maintenance, and flexibility for various operations is possible. The video above shows the PNP system used on an LR Mate 200iC robotic arm from FANUC. As demonstrated in the video, the end-effectors can lift both round bar and flat workpieces interchangeably with ease. 

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 29. April 2014

Which Path Did You Choose?

Nonprofit Workshops for Warriors trains U.S. military veterans for manufacturing jobs.
(Photo provided by Workshops for Warriors.).

In the most recent issue of MMS Extra, I wrote a short piece reviewing some of the training programs we’ve covered in the past—Workshops for Warriors and Skills Inc., to name two. Both of these are somewhat unconventional; Workshops for Warriors trains U.S. military veterans for manufacturing careers, while Skills Inc. helps place individuals with physical disabilities in jobs where they can succeed.

But we’re curious: What other notable training programs are out there? Maybe you were a student there, or your company has hired its graduates. Or maybe you just heard about it through the grapevine. Let us know by joining the discussion on our LinkedIn group or by sending me an email

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