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Stephanie Monsanty

Stephanie Monsanty worked as a summer intern in 2012 and joined the Modern Machine Shop team as assistant editor later that fall. She edits product and industry news for the print magazine as well as MMS Online. Stephanie completed her M.A. in professional writing at the University of Cincinnati in 2013, and also holds a B.A. in English literature and history from the University of Mount Union.

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 31. October 2014

Get Focused

Microscopes offer the magnification necessary to inspect small parts, but the in-focus viewing field can be limited. A digital microscope with autofocusing capabilities can simplify inspection by creating composite images that show the entire selected field in focus at once. 

Operating an inspection microscope can be similar to taking a photo with manual focus. Like a photographer, the inspector must position the subject, check lighting, manage variables such as exposure and shutter speed, and adjust the zoom and focus of the lens to bring the feature of interest into view. However, while a photographer may purposefully create an image with blurred edges, shallow depth of field or other effects, industrial measurement and inspection tasks require clear, focused images. Inspecting all pieces of a part can mean repeatedly moving the part and readjusting the microscope to view all the detail necessary.

It is possible to automate steps in this process, however. For example the VHX-5000 digital inspection microscope from Keyence features auto-focusing capabilities to help take some of the time and difficulty out of capturing clear images for inspection purposes. Once a user moves the microscope to the desired viewing area on a given part, the VHX automatically scans through its focal range and quickly compiles a high-resolution composite image that shows all of the specified area in focus on the system’s screen. According to the company, the microscope’s high-frame-rate camera (offering 50 frames per second) can generate fully focused images in as little as one second.

In addition to saving time, the microscope also reduces the learning curve for operators. An Easy mode walks users through each function of the microscope to ensure its capacity is fully utilized, and, according to Keyence, improve the overall results obtained. Additionally, the microscope’s large depth of field, tilting arm and stage, and 0.1× to 5,000× magnification enable both 2D and 3D inspection. 

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 16. October 2014

A Square Hole for a Square Peg

This interior shot of AutoCrib’s TX750 tool vending system shows its vertical columns of adjustable shelves. To the left, you can see the inside of the system’s rolling dual-tambour door, capable of opening 2" to 60" to correspond with the selected bin.

Many industrial vending systems on the market today are based on pie-like trays divided into wedges. An operator calls up a tool or other expendable, and round carousels rotate until the appropriate wedge faces out. The operator can then open the door and remove the drill, insert or whatever it may be.

The system has its advantages, but according to Stephen Pixley, founder of AutoCrib, the wedge-shaped spaces also pose a dilemma. “Things come in rectangular boxes,” he points out, which means that in stocking the wedges, companies must waste either time (unpacking the boxes) or space (storing a square or rectangular box in a wedge-shaped hole).

Rather than pie-shaped trays system, AutoCrib’s TX750 vending system uses a carousel with slots more accommodating to box-shaped contents. The vending system features columns with adjustable shelving to accommodate boxes—as well as other objects of varying shapes and sizes. The slots can be adjusted to hold everything from a tiny insert to a 2-foot-plus fluorescent light bulb. The customizability of the slots reduces vertical bin height waste and increases the capacity that can be stored within a compact footprint. As many as 900 bins can be packed into the unit, which occupies 9.8 square feet of floor space.

The TX750 has another advantage that enables it to provide just the right product at the right time: rolling dual-tambour doors. When an operator calls for a product in a particular slot, the two doors rotate to the appropriate shelf and open only that slot. The doors can open to anywhere from 2" to 60" in half-inch increments.

The vending system is controlled by AutoCrib’s user interface with 19" touchscreen, and a native bin assignment process simplifies stocking the unit on the fly. Operators can identify themselves with an ID card or a fingerprint and search the system to retrieve items.  

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 29. September 2014

Video: From 2D to Five-Axis

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Waterjet technology is well-suited to cutting large 2D workpieces out of sheets of material, but Jet Edge’s Edge X-5 demonstrates how a waterjet can effectively cut three-dimensional parts as well. The waterjet’s five-axis Permalign Edge cutting head enables it to produce features such as weld bevels and countersink holes, as well as reduce tapering in the jet stream. The waterjet offers a Z-axis travel of 12" and is available with a work envelope ranging from 5 × 5 feet to 24 × 8 feet.

In the video above, the Edge X-5 is cutting Jet Edge-branded bottle openers out of 1/4"-thick aluminum using 80 mesh garnet abrasive. The piece showcases the waterjet’s five-axis capability with features such as the angled “Jet Edge” lettering and the chamfering around the outer edges.

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 15. September 2014

Forecasting the Future at GFMC

“Hindsight is 20/20,” the saying goes—but that doesn’t mean manufacturers have to go into the future blindly. Self-knowledge, benchmarking data and strategic planning are tools available to help prepare for what’s ahead, if not predict it. The 2014 Global Forecasting & Marketing Conference (GFMC) is another such tool. The conference, taking place October 14-16 at the MGM Grand Detroit in Michigan will offer reports on past performance as well as industry outlooks to help attendees plan for future success.

Hosted by AMT—The Association For Manufacturing Technology, the GFMC includes a line-up of presentations by industry experts including Marc Raibert, founder and CTO of Boston Dynamics; Bill Horwarth, president of 5ME; Mike Warner, director of market analysis at Boeing; and Steven R. Kline Jr., director of market intelligence at Gardner Business Media. Networking opportunities will also be available throughout the three-day event. View the full schedule or register

Posted by: Stephanie Monsanty 5. August 2014

“Covering” the Metalworking Industry

Modern Machine Shop is sporting a new look this month, with a custom cover depicting the Chicago skyline foregrounded by the Cloud Gate (also known as “the Bean”) and IMTS balloon. Artist Charla Steele created the collage from magazine pieces that she tore out of past MMS issues and glued to a 40" × 58" canvas. Her goal was to produce a complete, whole image while still honoring its various parts, which are representative of the equipment, companies and industries we cover each month. “As readers explore its details, I hope they will gain a new appreciation for what’s in Modern Machine Shop each month,” she says of the collage, which will be displayed in the Gardner Business Media booth (W-10) at IMTS 2014, happening September 8-13 at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

Charla will also be creating another collage on-site at IMTS. Stop by Booth W-10 Monday through Thursday during the show for a firsthand look at her creative process. 

Charla layered more than 500 magazine pieces onto the canvas to create the cover image.

Read more about the MMS cover here, and view more of Charla’s artwork on her website.  

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