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Steve Kline, Jr.

Steve Kline, Jr. has been providing financial analysis and economic forecasts for Gardner Publications, Inc. (publisher of Modern Machine Shop) since 2005. While he has a degree in civil engineering from Vanderbilt University and a MBA with an emphasis on finance from the University of Cincinnati, Steve views forecasting as more of an art than a science. Therefore, his analysis focuses on trends between different data sets to determine where the economy (and, more importantly, the metalworking industry) may be headed. The study of economics is his life’s passion, hence the T-shirts of his favorite economists. Yes…any time he wears these, his wife points out that he truly is a geek.

Posted by: Steve Kline, Jr. 5. October 2012

September MBI at 46.6 – Industry Moves off Peak Levels

 
With a reading of 46.6, September’s Metalworking Business Index showed that the metalworking industry has contracted for the third month in a row. The August MBI provided an indication that the industry would break out of its slowing trend, which began in March 2012. However, the results of the September MBI indicate that the slowing trend continues. With some key leading indicators for metalworking still strong, the question is: How far and for how long will the industry contract? Is this a temporary slowdown while the industry waits to see what happens in the election, or is it linked to a world economy that is already slowing at a more significant rate?
 
Five of the six subindices used to compute the MBI had a negative impact on the reading in September. The new orders index showed faster contraction in September, reaching its lowest level since July 2009. After moving from contraction to expansion in August, the production index moved back into contraction in September. New orders have been contracting faster than production and this has put pressure on backlogs. The backlog index has contracted for six consecutive months and is at its lowest level since July 2009. Employment continues to expand as it has for 17 straight months. Reports from IMTS indicate that virtually every company affiliated with the metalworking industry is still looking to hire more people. Supplier deliveries was the only subindex to make a positive contribution to the September MBI. Delivery times lengthened more during the month.
 
Future business expectations continue to move lower, reaching their lowest level since July 2009. Also, future business expectations have been below average for the last three months.
Posted by: Steve Kline, Jr. 24. September 2012

Annual Industrial Production Growing Fastest Since February 2011

 

 
The consumer durable goods industrial production index was 93.4 in August 2012. This is about the average level of the production index in 2012. The annual rate of change is growing at the fastest rate since February 2011. Since January 1970, the annual rate of change has grown faster than August 2012 slightly less than 10 percent of the time. Durable goods manufacturing is in a very strong period of growth. However, compared to August 2011, industrial production was 5.7 percent higher in August 2012. This is the slowest rate of growth month over month since November 2011. It is likely that the annual rate of change will peak during the fourth quarter of 2012. Consumer durable goods industrial production leads capital equipment spending by 12-18 months. Therefore, we should see continued growth in capital equipment spending throughout 2013.
 
A good leading indicator for consumer durable goods industrial production is consumer durable goods spending. Spending levels remain at all-time highs. The month-over-month rate of change in spending in July was 8.0 percent, which is well above the average rate of growth. Also, the annual rate of growth in spending has accelerated the last three months. This indicates that consumer durable goods industrial production should continue to remain at a high level.
 
To see more information on industrial production and its leading indicators go here.

 

Posted by: Steve Kline, Jr. 18. September 2012

July Machine Tool Orders Slower, 2013 Forecast is Strong

 

 
According to USMTO, machine tool orders in July 2012 were 1,849 units and $374,323,000. July broke the string of five consecutive months of more than 2,000 units ordered. Also, July 2012 orders were 1.5 percent lower than orders in July 2011. This is just the second time since December 2009 that month over month orders contracted. Compared to the same month one year ago, dollar sales contracted more significantly than unit sales. Also, dollar sales have contracted three of the last five months. Therefore, the annual rates of change for units and dollars are much closer than they have been since late 2010. One reason that unit sales are holding up better than dollar sales is that the U.S. machine tool market is perhaps the strongest in the world at the moment (and this looks to continue to be the case in 2013). The U.S. market is forecast to see continued growth in 2013 while most other markets around the world will see much slower growth or contraction. So, builders are competing harder for sales in the U.S., which is taking away some pricing power from machine tool builders.
 
The annual rate of change for machine tool sales continues to grow more slowly. This is expected and the trend should continue until early 2013, according to our forecast. Based on Gardner’s Capital Spending Survey, spending on machine tools should remain strong in 2013, increasing 8-15 percent. According to the survey, current capacity utilization is 80.1 percent which is the highest since 1999. Also, capacity utilization has increased significantly since 2009 when it was just 61 percent. The historically high level and rapid rate of growth in capacity utilization will keep machine tool sales strong throughout 2013. Also, industrial production continues to grow at an accelerating rate, which is another sign that machine tool sales should be strong in 2013. While the dollar continues to gain against other currencies, which points to slower machine tool sales, the recent announcement of more QE by the Federal Reserve should help bring the value of the dollar down relative to other currencies. This could provide further support to machine tool sales in 2013.


 

Posted by: Steve Kline, Jr. 6. September 2012

Industry Growth Flattens


With a reading of 49.5, the August Metalworking Business Index showed that the metalworking industry contracted for the second month in a row, but the two months of contraction were extremely shallow. The index works by comparing the current month’s activity to previous month’s activity, so August’s index is saying that overall, the metalworking industry is performing at a level just below the peak activity of this cycle. Also, the graphs for the overall index and subindices had been declining for five or six months. However, the downward trend line in each graph appears to have broken in August. We will need to see a couple more months of data before that call can be made definitively.

 
 
All but one subindex had a positive percent change in August. New orders continued to contract, but did so more slowly. Production increased in August, but new orders will need to start growing again for this to continue. Backlogs contracted more slowly. New orders will need to grow or production needs to slow for this to be a continuing phenomenon. Employment continues to increase in the metalworking industry. Supplier deliveries are still lengthening, indicating strength throughout manufacturing, but they are lengthening more slowly.
 
While future business expectations have been muted (with the passing of health care reform and the presidential election probably playing a significant role), expectations improved in August. Future expectations still are slightly below average since the inception of the MBI, but they are back above the previous lows in this expansionary cycle. Planned capital spending over the next 12 months has remained relatively flat. This could be an indication that businesses are not concerned enough about the future to alter their investment plans.


 

Posted by: Steve Kline, Jr. 21. August 2012

Industrial Production Still Growing Faster

The consumer durable goods industrial production index was 84.8 in July 2012. This is the lowest level for the index since December 2011, but July is a seasonally low month for manufacturing output. Compared to July 2011, industrial production grew 8.7%. This is a strong rate of growth but is the lowest month-over-month growth rate since December 2011. Despite the slower rate of growth in July, the annual rate of change continued its rapid acceleration. The annual rate of growth is now 8.7%, which is the fastest rate of annual growth since March 2011. Also, this marks the ninth consecutive month of growth for consumer durable goods industrial production. Since consumer durable goods industrial production is the best leading indicator for machine tool sales, this is a very positive sign for future machine tool consumption.

A good leading indicator for consumer durable goods industrial production is consumer durable goods spending. Spending levels remain near all-time highs. The month-over-month rate of change in spending in June was 8.2%, which is the fastest since February 2011. Also, the annual rate of growth in spending has accelerated each of the last two months. This indicates that consumer durable goods industrial production should continue to grow faster.
 
 
To see more information on industrial production and its leading indicators go here.


 

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