Emily Probst

Emily Probst is the associate editor for Modern Machine Shop. She joined the staff in the summer of 2006 as the editorial intern editing product releases for the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS). Hired full-time in 2007 after graduating with a B.S.J. from Ohio University, she edited product releases and columns until 2012, when she moved to her current role of writing and editing case studies for both print and online media channels. In this role, she has been fortunate enough to travel the world as well as visit some interesting shops and trade shows in the United States. She also administers Modern’s blog as well as its Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts.

Posted by: Emily Probst 26. November 2015

Amerimold 2016 Dates Announced

Tool or die? Or mold or jig or fixture? If you answer yes (to any or all of the above), you should know about Amerimold 2016. It’s an annual event that benefits every aspect of a contract tool and mold manufacturing business. And, Amerimold has just recently announced its plans for 2016. Now in its 15th year, the event formerly known as the MoldMaking Expo will take place June 15-16, 2016, at Novi, Michigan’s Suburban Collection Showplace.

Presented by our friends at MoldMaking Technology, the two-day event will include an exhibit hall filled with equipment for designing, machining and maintaining tools and molds; a technical program featuring experts on product technologies and process innovations being developed and adopted by leading manufacturers, and there will be ample formal and informal business networking opportunities.

But, how does the event benefit every aspect of a tool and mold manufacturing business.?

  • Equipment: The Amerimold exhibit hall will feature leading suppliers of machine tools, materials, components, cutting tools, software and more. By visiting the show, you’ll be able to research and discover the latest equipment technologies. You can also meet with applications experts and sales engineers that can assist directly with addressing your production needs and challenges. Here is a list of who is already exhibiting.
  • Operations:The Amerimold technical conference includes sessions on designing, machining and maintaining molds. Participants in the conference walk away with real, applications-based solutions and strategies that can immediately impact business. Take a look at last year’s program.
  • Sales: In recent years, Amerimold has become an event the serves the sourcing needs of the tool and mold manufacturing market. Buyers from OEMs and large manufacturers attend the event to meet with contract tool and mold manufacturers. In fact, in 2015, Amerimold featured a record number of exhibiting tool and mold makers, who invested in displaying their services to interested buyers. These are those tool and mold makers.

So, if your business involves making tools or dies (or molds or jigs or fixtures) and you are involved in managing your equipment, your operations or your sales – set aside June 15-16, 2016, to participate in Amerimold 2016. In the meantime, be on the lookout for Amerimold announcements on conference programming, registration, special events and more. is a great place to look. Or, you can connect to Amerimold on social media (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn).

Posted by: Emily Probst 26. October 2015

6 Factors Help Maximize Profitability in High-Precision Machining

To remain competitive, manufacturers need to find ways to eliminate unplanned downtime, minimize scrap rates, ensure consistency and produce high-performance precision parts at a reasonable price. According to Optis, a joint venture that brings together the machining expertise, analytic tools and process improvements of TechSolve with the heritage of Castrol, OEMs currently demand between a 3 to 5 percent reduction in costs for their parts each year and they expect each supplier to achieve or exceed these targets.

Jon Iverson, CEO of Optis says it is important to take an integrated approach to improving manufacturing performance and lists six key considerations that should form an integral part of the manufacturing strategy. Those considerations include machine tools, cutting tools, work material, cutting fluid, machining accessories and machining parameters. Read his full explanation here.

An integrated, holistic approach that considers and optimizes all six factors will lead the manufacturer to a more profitable state of operations, Mr. Iverson says. By thoroughly understanding and acting on these elements, he says manufactures can overcome many of the primary barriers to competitiveness and compliance.

Posted by: Emily Probst 22. October 2015

New Facility to Help Strengthen Röhm’s U.S. Presence

Dr. Joachim Hümmler and Matthew Mayer cut the ceremonial ribbon during Röhm's grand opening celebration in Suwanee, Georgia.

German workholding technology provider Röhm has opened its new 32,000-square-foot North American headquarters in Suwanee, Georgia. The facility is three times larger than its previous one, enabling the company to manufacture in the United States for the first time as well as expand the service and support it provides. 

During the recent grand opening event, Dr. Joachim Hümmler, CEO of the Röhm Group, said being a local partner will enable the company to meet its customers’ needs faster. For example, instead of waiting 8 to 10 weeks to ship jaws from Germany, they can be delivered in as little as 2 to 4 weeks, depending on the jaw size and configuration. Having better control over the manufacturing process will enable the company to improve its price points and become more competitive.

This is important as the manufacturing sector has been showing signs of softening for the past 6 months. Matthew Mayer, CEO of Röhm Products of America says Rohm needs to be fast and flexible enough to react to the market. “As you know, oil and gas was like a light switch. It’s not easy to plan for, and it’s not easy to ramp up production.”

Yet this is what the company has already done. Last year, its primary focus was on oil and gas products, and this year it’s automotive. In fact, Sven Haag, CMO of the Röhm Group and member of the board, said 30 percent of the company’s revenue currently comes from this sector.

However, Rohm isn’t throwing in the towel on oil and gas quite yet. “We aren’t stopping development of products for this area because it will come back, and we want to be prepared for it,” Mr. Hümmler said.

It’s more important now more than ever for oil-pipe producers to run more efficiently, he says. When the oil and gas sector ramps back up, these producers need to be able to do more with less. For example, Röhm makes a six-jaw, oil-pipe chuck that eliminates 10 minutes of setup time. It also makes a swivel chuck for threading couplets that eliminates two handling operations. Payback on these investments would be realized very quickly, Mr. Hümmler said.

Rohm’s strength lies in its large product line, which encompasses virtually every sector in the industry. Given this diversity, Mr. Hümmler said the company plans to triple its sales volumes in the next 5 years.

Posted by: Emily Probst 20. October 2015

Take the Metalworking Operational Trends Survey

It makes smart business sense to compare your company to those similar in the metalworking community. One way to do this is to participate in the annual Metalworking Operational Trends Survey from LoSasso Integrated Marketing. In return, you will be entered for a chance to win a $500 Amazon gift card, and if you provide your email address, you can choose to receive the Executive Summary once it is finalized. The Executive Summary includes snapshots on the overall health of the metalworking industry, strong and weak performers, and purchase drivers.

Take the survey here.

Posted by: Emily Probst 12. October 2015

View the October 2015 Digital Issue

The cover story for our October 2015 issue tells the story of East Branch Engineering, a company that uses live-tool turning centers to complete complex parts in one setup. However, it also leverages a flexible and reconfigurable “mini-cell” strategy to enable a single operator to tend two machines at once, essentially gaining “free” machining time by overlapping operations. Read more here.

Also in this issue:

Read the full issue here.

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