Blog
 

Emily Probst

Emily Probst is the associate editor for Modern Machine Shop. She joined the staff in the summer of 2006 as the editorial intern editing product releases for the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS). Hired full-time in 2007 after graduating with a B.S.J. from Ohio University, she edited product releases and columns until 2012, when she moved to her current role of writing and editing case studies for both print and online media channels. In this role, she has been fortunate enough to travel the world as well as visit some interesting shops and trade shows in the United States. She also administers Modern’s blog as well as its Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts.

Posted by: Emily Probst 27. August 2015

Seven World Premieres Highlighted at Innovation Days Event in Japan

More than 8,900 people visited DMG MORI's newly remodeled Iga Solution Center
during "Innovation Days" in Japan.

During DMG MORI's “Innovation Days” event July 22-25 in Japan, the company showcased 58 machine tools in its newly renovated Iga Global Solution Center, which boasts 3,500 m2 (37,674 ft.2) of floor space. I, along with other members of the international press, got the chance to visit the spacious new addition, which also houses "Excellence Centers" for automotive, aerospace, die and mold, and medical—four industries in which the company expects continuous growth. The DMG MORI Porsche car is also on display.

During the event, Dr. Thorsten Schmidt, deputy chairman of the executive board, commented on the high stability of machine tool consumption this year. He says that machine tool consumption in the United States is up 6.9 percent, with Japan seeing an 8.1 percent increase, and a worldwide consumption increase of 3.3 percent. Dr. Masahiko Mori, president of DMG MORI, outlined the company’s product offering plans for the future. By 2020, he says DMG MORI wants to reduce its product models from 300 to 150, and provide a wider range of solutions with extensive applications. The company’s goal is to achieve the capacity to produce 18,000 machines a year.

Dr. Schmidt and Dr. Mori spoke to the international press.

Seven machine tools were introduced during the event, one of which was the Lasertec 4300 3D. Perhaps the most fascinating machine for me to see in person, the Lasertec integrates additive manufacturing into a turning/milling machine. The machine uses a directed energy deposition process by means of a powder nozzle, which is said to be 20 times faster in deposition than a powder bed. And as many as five deposition heads can be automatically parked in a secure docking station while turn/mill operations are being performed. The deposition heads can be prepared for ID deposition, OD deposition, large diameters of deposition, or small, heat-treating, surface-hardening, or welding.

According to Rory Dudas of DMG MORI, “Additive is where the future is going.” The fact that the technology can be used to produce complex parts with exotic materials—and it can be used in combination with traditional subtractive machining methods on the same platform means the technology is no longer restricted to the production of prototypes and small parts. Prior solutions were restricted to the build of a single alloy, while the new method enables the machine to use multiple materials—via laminations or gradual transitions from one alloy to another.

According to Dr. Mori, the company is currently selling one additive machine per month, but his goal is to raise that number to five or six.

Other machines that made their world premieres at the event include:

  • The NLX 300 | 300. This high-rigidity, high-precision CNC lathe features 3,000 mm between centers. It is well-suited for machining workpieces ranging to 3,123 mm long and 430 mm in diameter.
  • The A-18S (DMG MORI Wasino). This high-precision, compact, multi-processing turning center is equipped with a Y-axis turret and milling functions. It features 18 tool stations—the largest number in its class.
     
  • The G-07 (DMG MORI Wasino). The super-high-precision lathe reduces cycle times due to its gantry-type tool post. The gang-type lathe is said to achieve high accuracy in finishing, hard turning and high added-value machining.
     
  • The ecoMill 600 V, ecoMill 800 V and ecoMill 1100 V. The newly designed ecoMill V series of vertical machining centers features 6 micron accuracy (without direct scales) due to direct coupling in the X and Y axes. The series does not include a belt drive, which eliminates backlash. To increase productivity, the machines feature a 12,000-rpm spindle speed, 119 Nm of torque and 560 mm of stroke in the Y axis.
Posted by: Emily Probst 16. June 2015

June 2015 Digital Edition Now Available

Click the image above to access a digital edition of the June issue
of 
Modern Machine Shop.

“It’s like shuffling a deck of cards every day,” says Paul Hogoboom about the challenge of managing ever-shifting job priorities at P&J Machining. The shop has a long history of light-out machining on flexible machining systems and palletized cells, yet its newest system, which consists of two four-axis Matsurra HMCs with a Fastems pallet storage and retrieval system, represents what Mr. Hogoboom considers the most important advance in this sector of lights-out aerospace machining, namely, the control software’s capability to automatically reschedule job priorities on the fly based on shifting demands in production from customers. Learn more here.

Also in this issue:

Read the full issue here.

Posted by: Emily Probst 29. May 2015

Amerimold: The Event for Mold Manufacturing

Are you looking for machines, tools, software and materials? Register today for Amerimold 2015, which runs from June 17-18 at the Donald E. Stephens Center in Rosemont, Illinois. The show will give you a first-hand look at the leading suppliers of product technology for tool and mold making. It also provides at least three opportunities to improve your business:

  • Exhibit Hall. Meet exhibitors featuring technologies impacting every aspect of the mold manufacturing business, from mold design to 3D part machining.
     
  • Education. Focused on end-user processes that will improve your expertise and efficiency in designing, building and maintaining molds.
     
  • Events. Exclusive networking events aim to connect builders, buyers and suppliers for production sourcing, technology transfer and business development.

The annual event is presented by Gardner Business Media, in partnership with Modern Machine Shop, and its sister publications Moldmaking Technology, Plastics Technology and Automotive Design and Production

Posted by: Emily Probst 18. March 2015

The Importance of Properly Maintained Grinding Oils

Vomat systems provide micro filtration to particle sizes of 3 to 5 microns. 

An often overlooked variable of grinding precision tools is maintaining your grinding oils. This is important because coolants minimize friction and eliminate excessive heat at the point of contact between the wheel and the tool. During the machining process, grinding oils are contaminated by metal debris, dirt and decomposition stemming from extreme heat exposure. When coolants are not thoroughly filtered, it is necessary to change them often.

Optimally filtered coolants, however, have two main positive effects on the production of cutting tools: They improve grinding economy, and they enable tool manufacturers to produce high-quality products.

According to Steffen Strobel of Vomat, a manufacturer of fine filtration systems, the requirements for high-quality tools are constantly on the rise and, therefore, tools must be ground with much more precision. To achieve this, manufacturers are investing in modern machinery and climate-controlled production facilities. Given this kind of expenditure, there is no room for cheap compromises when it comes to coolant filtration, he says. The coolant must have a high degree of purity since coarse particles can interfere with the grinding process and prevent the manufacture of tight-tolerance tools.

To improve grinding oil maintenance, Vomat offers its FA series of fine filtration systems. The series is designed to provide full flow (non-bypass) filtration of clean oil, which is tailored to the needs of the production machines. The filter cartridges are automatically cleaned with 100 percent separation of clean and dirty oil. The filters’ capacity, combined with the on-demand backwash cycle, are designed to increase service life of the metal coolant. This not only prevents loss of tool quality, but also saves money on metal coolants, the company says. Coolants don’t have to be changed as often either.

Posted by: Emily Probst 5. March 2015

March 2015 Digital Edition Now Available

The digital edition of Modern Machine Shop's March 2015 issue is now available.

The digital March 2015 issue of Modern Machine Shop is now available. The cover story discusses the evolution of micromachining and some lessons one shop in particular has learned along the way. Other stories discuss how advances in wire EDM technology have made it acceptable for machining critical aerospace parts, how a job shop relying on homegrown talent was able to win aerospace and defense work while expanding its five-axis capabilities, and how additive manufacturing already plays a major role in aircraft production.

Our Rapid Traverse section takes an in-depth look at spindle housings and motors, an automotive cylinder coating for high-production applications, and a multi-axis workholding system that uses a three-side dovetail.

This month’s Better Production section explores how a shopfloor CMM reduces production bottlenecks, how in-house CNCs helped an automotive shop gain manufacturing control, and how one shop used CAM software as the key to its continuous improvement efforts.

The Modern Equipment Review section highlights machining centers.

« Prev | | Next »

Subscribe to these Related
RSS Blog Feeds

MMS ONLINE
Channel Partners
  • Techspex