A New Search, And A New Search

Last month, Jim Wales, the founder of Wikipedia announced that he will begin leveraging the popular online encyclopedia model to build a search engine. He says Wiki is going after Google and Yahoo.

Columns From: 5/2/2007 Modern Machine Shop, ,

Last month, Jim Wales, the founder of Wikipedia announced that he will begin leveraging the popular online encyclopedia model to build a search engine. He says Wiki is going after Google and Yahoo. “Yeah, right,” you say? Well, before you dismiss this guy as just another poser looking to unseat the royalty of online searching without much of a chance, visit www.mmsonline.com/otw for a few points that make this idea more viable for manufacturers than others we’ve seen or heard of before.

And speaking of searching, this column marks the end of my career with Modern Machine Shop as I continue my own search for . . . well, the next chapter, I guess. I am moving on to a new job, a new city, and new challenges. Before I wrap this sucker up, I’d like to let you know a few things.

First, I feel remarkably privileged to have served manufacturing in some small way for the past 12 years. I’ve had the opportunity to speak with many of you about your Web strategies and tactics, and I hope I was able to help inspire you to embrace this still-evolving medium. Regardless, know that I’ve felt honored for the trust you’ve shown me and bowled over by the chance to contribute to such an integral part of our nation’s fabric as manufacturing.

Next, know that I feel just as privileged to have worked with, learned from and contributed to a team as talented and committed as MMS. From the sales staff to the editors to the support staffs that produce the magazine and MMS Online, everyone that serves or has served MMS over the years has been top-notch. I know of no other group in our world that works anywhere near as vigorously to serve its readers and visitors than MMS.

I also want to thank my family at Gardner Publications, parent company of MMS. They welcomed me and taught me and let me share in their successes, because that’s just what they do with their own.

Lastly, I’d like share one final Web analogy with you. I’m 50 years old, in a great job with an even greater company, and I’m changing it all. I’m putting geographical distance between me and people so dear to me you cannot comprehend it and moving to unfamiliar city. I am invigorated, excited and scared to death. But I have to do this to stay fresh, to keep growing.

I wish for you the same daring (chaos?) in your business during these turbulent times for U.S. manufacturing. Embrace technologies that differentiate you. Embrace change. Capitalize on shifting markets, and be bold. And tell the world through your Web site why you rock.

Godspeed.

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