Automated High-Speed Machining For Small-Part Manufacturing

 The M8 is a five-axis, high speed machining center designed for manufacturing small parts, especially those requiring tight tolerances. The center can access five sides of a part to complete it in a single set-up. According to the company, the center is ideal for producing medical, aerospace and electro-mechanical components.

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The M8 is a five-axis, high speed machining center designed for manufacturing small parts, especially those requiring tight tolerances.

The center can access five sides of a part to complete it in a single set-up. According to the company, the center is ideal for producing medical, aerospace and electro-mechanical components. The company also offers a robotic interface and a pick-and-place system for automated manufacturing.

The center features a steel bridge reinforced with polymer concrete for stability and support for heavier spindles. Spindle options include a 2kW (2 ¾ hp), water-chilled, 60,000 rpm spindle and a 3kW, 40,000 rpm, HSK-E 25 spindle. Automatic tool change options include a 30-tool "station-style" rack with tool-length sensor for the 2kW spindle and a 10-tool changer for the 3kW spindle. Other features include a stabilized gantry, an integrated, pneumatically covered tool magazine, an LCD flat-panel display, polycarbonate side windows and a removable chip cart on wheels. The Microsoft Windows-based controller works with virtually any CAD/CAM software and offers Ethernet networking capability as well as remote monitoring and control.

Other options include a Z-correction probe that measures surface irregularities and dynamically compensates for them; a 3D probe extension that enables the Z-correction probe to function in 3D (X, Y and Z); a Renishaw TP20 probe for complex part measurement; Vacumate and Quick-Pallets workholding for quick setup; and a digital I/O that provides 8 outputs from the CNC control.

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