Five-Axis Machining Center Sustains Accuracy

Makino’s D800Z five-axis vertical machining center is designed for high-performance job-shop, precision parts machining, die and mold, and aerospace applications.

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Makino’s D800Z five-axis vertical machining center is designed for high-performance job-shop, precision parts machining, die and mold, and aerospace applications. The machine’s two-sided front door design provides easy access to the spindle and table, and accommodates workpieces ranging to 1,000-mm in diameter and weighing as much as 1,200 kg for five-axis machining. The five-face milling mode can be used to minimize setup and reduce cycle times on complex, multisided parts; or to meet the the angular, blending, matching and fine-surface finishing and 3D accuracy requirements of die and mold components.

The integral direct-drive motor design of the fourth and fifth axes, and rigid supporting machine structure deliver smooth motion and accuracy even with large workpieces, the company says. Core-cooled ballscrews, temperature-controlled direct-drive motors and a large machine structure provide thermal stability for sustained accuracy. The Z shape of the tilt-trunnion table ensures that the center of gravity and work area are within the center of rotation of the B and C axes. Large-diameter bearings minimize table deflection and provide rigidity.

The machining center can be equipped with 12,000- to 20,000-rpm spindle, and 40- or 48-tool magazines. Feed rates are 36,000 mm/min. in the X, Y and Z axes, and 18,000 degrees/min. (50 rpm) in the B and X axes. The machine also features Makino’s Super Geometric Intelligence (SGI.4) software for machining complex, 3D-contoured shapes involving continuous small blocks of NC data, and is equipped with the Tool Center Point (TCP) control which enables programming based on the tool tip for compensation features.

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