Laser Sintering System Builds Metal Parts

EOS’ M 290 direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) system, the successor to its EOSINT M 280, is designed for the production of serial components, spare parts and prototypes.

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EOS’s M 290 direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) system, the successor to its EOSINT M 280, is designed for the production of serial components, spare parts and prototypes. In addition to a build volume of 250 × 250 × 325 mm (9.8" × 9.8" × 12.8"), the EOS M 290 offers monitoring functions for both the system itself and for the build process. Equipped with a 400-W laser, it can be operated under an inert (nitrogen) atmosphere or under argon, which enables processing of a variety of materials, including light alloys, stainless and tool-grade steels, and superalloys.

EOSystem machine software enables intuitive and task-oriented operation of the system via a graphic user interface that was developed specially for production environments. In addition, an operator assistant guides the user through the program. New EOSprint desktop software allows jobs to be prepared and computed directly at the workplace, separately from the build process. The job file can then be transferred through the network to the system, which can then build the part.

Separately, EOS collaborated with Airbus Group Innovations (previously EADS Innovation Works) to evaluate the environmental impact of rapid investment casting versus DMLS using an Airbus A320 nacelle hinge bracket. The study found significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions over the lifecycle of the DMLS-produced part, in addition to weight reduction.

Adapted from Airbus’ streamlined lifecycle assessment (SLCA) and ISO 14040 series requirements data, the testing will serve as the basis for continued “cradle-to-cradle” study into other aerospace parts, processes and end-of-life strategies, the companies say.

For more information on the study, visit eos.info/press/customer_case_studies/eads.

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