High Speed Machining

Exploring the: High Speed Machining Zone

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Published: 4/29/2010

Basic Questions on High Speed Machining
Can HSM apply to turning? Does the “speed” refer to cutting speed or spindle speed? What is the explanation behind lower forces and lower heat generation?

Published: 3/31/2010

Another Angle On HSM
The savings in setup time were welcome enough, but this mold maker found that a 3+2 machining center also accelerated its use of high speed machining.

Published: 3/11/2010

When Spindle Speed is a Constraint
Though it won’t replace high speed machining, Boeing sees “low speed machining” as a viable supplement to higher-rpm machines. Using new tools and techniques, a shop’s lower-rpm machining centers can realize much more of their potential productivity...

Published: 2/17/2010

High Speed Machining's Origin Moment
An important episode for high speed machining illustrates one of the most underappreciated aspects of the value of manufacturing.

Published: 2/12/2010

Dial Down or Dial Up?
Vibration analysis may be the machining center’s missing piece. If you haven’t performed this analysis on your high speed machine, you probably don’t know what the machine can do.

Published: 2/12/2010

The Promise of "High Cube" Machining
Tool paths and a new tool design provide an alternative to high speed machining for achieving high metal removal rates in hard metals on lighter-duty machines.

Published: 2/8/2010

When to Mill Keeps Changing
Technology improvements steadily expand the range of tool and die parts that justify high speed machining.

Published: 1/26/2009

What Is The Right Way To Become An Aerospace Shop?
This Atlanta shop succeeded at becoming an aircraft-industry parts supplier. The lessons of its success have a lot to do with commitment and enthusiasm.

Published: 6/17/2008

The Case For Constant Velocity
Constant Velocity Technology uses high speed computer hardware and creative algorithms to enable machine tools to achieve fast, consistent feed rates across complicated 3D surfaces.

Published: 3/20/2008

No Need For Speed
In this shop, high speed machining makes sense at 4,000 rpm. While the disciplines the shop put in place made a new 15,000-rpm profiler dramatically more productive, high speed machining would have remained valuable even if the new machine never cam...