Process Zones

Exploring the: High Speed Machining Zone
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The Costs and Benefits of Horizontal Machining

The shift from vertical to horizontal machining was even more expensive than this shop anticipated. It was also more valuable. Most of the shop’s machining centers are HMCs now—here’s why.


High Speed Leads to Lights-Out

This mold maker has become more competitive by establishing a high speed machining process that is predictable enough to confidently run lights-out.


Maximizing Power for High Speed Hog-outs

A reader asks a question related to the rated power of a machine tool spindle.


Improving Surface Finish During High Speed Machining

Many factors can affect surface finish. This answer to a reader’s question focuses on imbalance and frequency sensitivity.


The Online Optimizer

Coming soon: The Machine Tool Genome Project promises to let almost any machine shop use its machining centers more productively. Shops will benefit from tap-test findings without personally tapping any of their own machines or tools.


Software/Tooling Partnership Promises Easier HSM

High-efficiency parameters are calculated automatically—partly using a slider that lets the programmer set the level of aggressiveness.


How to Overcome an Acc/Dec Limitation in High Speed Machining

A small pocket in a graphite workpiece limits productivity. Part of the expert’s response is to consider how a lower feed rate might actually be more productive—because the machine will spend more time at the programmed rate.


Basic Questions on High Speed Machining

Can HSM apply to turning? Does the “speed” refer to cutting speed or spindle speed? What is the explanation behind lower forces and lower heat generation?


Another Angle On HSM

The savings in setup time were welcome enough, but this mold maker found that a 3+2 machining center also accelerated its use of high speed machining.


When Spindle Speed is a Constraint

Though it won’t replace high speed machining, Boeing sees “low speed machining” as a viable supplement to higher-rpm machines. Using new tools and techniques, a shop’s lower-rpm machining centers can realize much more of their potential productivity...


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