Process Zones

High Speed Machining

High speed machining typically refers to making light milling passes at high spindle speed and feed rate to achieve a high metal removal rate. This practice can be effective for machining intricate core and cavity geometries in mold machining, and for quickly machining large, complex aircraft structural components out of solid blocks of aluminum.

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Dial Down or Dial Up?


Vibration analysis may be the machining center’s missing piece. If you haven’t performed this analysis on your high speed machine, you probably don’t know what the machine can do.

Another Angle On HSM


The savings in setup time were welcome enough, but this mold maker found that a 3+2 machining center also accelerated its use of high speed machining.



MMS February 2016 cover

How to Increase Machining Efficiency through Machine Monitoring

By: Peter Zelinski
A manufacturer that is distinctive for its attention to in-cycle machining productivity describes its efforts to obtain efficiency improvements outside of the machining cycle. The shop’s primary tool is a simple, daily, graphical recap that illustrates when each machine tool was and was not making parts.

   Scott Fosdick and Form200U LP

Solution Days at GF Machining Solutions

By: Modern Machine Shop

 

Micromachining Evolution

By: Derek Korn
Challenge Machine continues to add high-speed equipment for the increasing amount of micromachining work it is performing. Here are some lessons it has learned along the way, using tools as small as 0.001 inch in diameter.

Hybrid Machine Combines Laser Sintering with Milling

By: Additive Manufacturing
The Lumex Avance-25 from MC Machinery Systems and Matsuura Machinery Corp. combines metal laser sintering technology with high-speed milling technology to produce complex parts using digital engineering and 3D data.

The Costs and Benefits of Horizontal Machining

By: Peter Zelinski
The shift from vertical to horizontal machining was even more expensive than this shop anticipated. It was also more valuable. Most of the shop’s machining centers are HMCs now—here’s why.


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