Metal Cutting

Machining Centers & Milling Machines

The term “machining center” describes almost any CNC milling and drilling machine that includes an automatic toolchanger and a table that clamps the workpiece in place. On a machining center, the tool rotates, but the work does not. The orientation of the spindle is the most fundamental defining characteristic of a machining center. Vertical machining centers generally favor precision while horizontal machining centers generally favor production—but these are loose generalizations, and plenty of machining centers break out of them. Another common machining center type is the five-axis machining center, which is able to pivot the tool and/or the part in order to mill and drill at various orientations.

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Cycle Efficiency


Automated machining processes enable this maker of high-performance mountain bike parts to manufacture efficiently with minimal staff.



Multi-Purpose VMC with Tilting Spindle Head

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The Doosan VCF850LSR, a vertical machining center featuring a traveling column design with a tilting spindle head, is capable of machining a range of parts, using as much as five axes simultaneously.

Werkzeugmaschinen UniSpeed universal machining center

Universal Machining Center Series Features Orthogonal Milling Heads

By: Edited by Stephanie Monsanty
Available from GBI Cincinnati, the SHW Werkzeugmaschinen UniSpeed series of compact universal machining centers is suitable for use in the moldmaking, job shop, tool construction and aviation industries.

Doosan VCF850LSR VMC

Traveling-Column VMC Machines Five Sides Simultaneously

By: Edited by Stephanie Monsanty
The Doosan VCF850LSR vertical machining center features a versatile traveling-column design with a tilting B-axis spindle head and a 500-mm (19.685") rotary table for machining multiple sides of a workpiece at once.

A Production Line Takes Shape

By: Mark Albert
Although Pointe Precision built its reputation on low-volume, high-complexity aerospace and medical parts, its expansive high-volume production line may be its biggest success to date. Sound decision-making and attention to details at every step are the keys to this success.

Tool Monitoring for Complex Machining

By: Lori Beckman
One of the biggest challenges to tool monitoring on a multitasking machine is coping with simultaneous cutting operations. Caron Engineering (Wells, Maine) designed a system to meet this challenge.


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