| 1 MINUTE READ

Compact Cylindrical Grinding Machine for High Production

United Grinding recently introduced its Studer S11 small-parts production grinding machine to the North American market. An online video demonstrates an interesting cam-actuated loading system that’s available with the machine.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon
Loading the player ...

The cam-actuated system shown in this video is one alternative for automated workpiece installation/removal on the new S11 cylindrical grinding machine. Note the in-process gaging capability being demonstrated, too.

United Grinding now offers its high-production Studer S11 cylindrical grinding machine for small parts. The S11 was not developed to be a universal-type grinding machine. Instead, it was specifically designed for automated, high-volume production of small, precision parts as long as 7.87 inches. The machine weights approximately 5,000 pounds and features a Granitan mineral-casting bed that offers good vibration damping qualities. It accommodates a 19.7-inch-diameter (500 mm) wheel and is available with the wheelhead plunge angle set at 0 or 20 degrees. It can also be set up to perform high-speed peel-grinding operations. Like other Studer cylindrical grinding machine designs, the X and Z axes are part of a self-contained cross-slide unit. Both axes have linear guideways mounted on roller bearings.

The S11 features a streamlined designed without unneeded options and uses no hydraulics. Instead, component actuation is performed electrically or pneumatically. Compact size with a floorspace area just over 19.4 square feet is combined with easy access for maintenance and setup. The main door offers three opening stages. Stage one opens upwards minimally and is intended for quick manual loading or a brief check of the workpiece. For stage two, the door opens a bit more so all table-mounted accessories are accessible from the top. Stage three enables a lower front panel to be dropped down to make the front fully accessible during set ups.

The machine is available in a range of automation configurations, and users should consult with UG representatives to determine the configuration that’s best-suited for their application. One is shown in the video above, in which a simple but effective cam system is used to remove and install workpieces from the chuck. StuderWinFocus software was developed for this machine to enable pictogram step-by-step programming, and the Siemens Sinumeric 840D SL control with touchscreen interface has a tablet look to it.

�

RELATED CONTENT

  • 10 Things to Know About Creep-Feed Grinding

    Because of the high material removal rate creep-feed grinding can deliver in challenging materials, grinding might not be just the last step in the process—it might be the process.

  • Getting The Most From Creep-Feed Grinding

    No other process can do what creep-feed grinding can do. Recent tests show even more can be gained by optimizing every element of a creep-feed system.

  • Grinding Carbide--A Niche Within A Niche

    If one must pick a manufacturing specialty, grinding carbide might not be the first choice because it’s perceived to be very difficult. RPM Carbide Die, however, has worked the material for nearly 40 years and, as specializing seems increasingly to be the order of the day, this northern Ohio shop is in a good position to thrive.