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FANUC Open House 2015

A visit to FANUC Corp. headquarters in Japan during its 2015 open house revealed new equipment, technologies and advances in factory automation, robotics and robomachines.

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The CR-35iA collaborative robot on display during FANUC's open house has a soft green cover to protect human coworkers in case of a collision. Click the image for a slideshow from the event.

During the second week of April—and with snowcapped Mt. Fuji looming in the near distance—FANUC opened the doors of its corporate campus in Oshino, Japan, to customers, integrators, collaborative partners and select members of the trade press. As a showcase for its new equipment and technologies, FANUC’s Open House 2015 also included tours of its milling, robot, servomotor and repair factories.

The star of the show was the CR-35iA collaborative robot, which made its debut at IMTS 2014 as a prototype. Scheduled to be available to the North American market starting this summer, the distinctive green robot eliminates the need for guarding around in its workspace by automatically stopping when it touches, or is touched by, a human operator. The robot is covered with a soft surface to prevent injuries, and the green color is meant to signal approachability. Working in cooperation with its operator, the CR-35iA is ideal for assembly and heavy parts transfer.

Additional launches included the M-2000iA/1700L (long arm) and 2300 super-heavy payload robots; Zero Down Time (ZDT) preventive and diagnostic technology for scheduling maintenance and avoiding shutdowns; new RoboDrill, RoboShot, RoboCut and RoboNano models; and the 30i-B series CNC with a newly designed human machine interface (HMI). Go here for a slideshow of these and additional FANUC technologies, and be looking for a post focusing on my conversation with Rick Schneider, president and CEO of FANUC America, on the company’s academic outreach efforts—including a new CNC simulator for classroom training purposes—in the coming weeks.

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