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Inside Haimer’s Expanded North American Headquarters

The company’s shrink-fit, balancing and tooling technologies are on display in a new 25,000 square-foot facility.

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Haimer’s 25,000-square-foot facility includes a training and demo area for the company’s range of shrink-fit, balancing and tooling technology.

Recently, I got to visit Haimer’s newly expanded North American headquarters in Villa Park, Illinois. The company’s facility has grown from 9,000 to 25,000 square feet where it maintains $5.5 million in inventory for its range of tool holders, shrink fit machines, balancing machines, 3D-sensors and cutting tools.

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This area I call a tool room for lean manufacturers.

The expansion includes new training area for customers and distributors as well as a showroom/demo area with high-speed VMC. The company also has a five-axis tool grinding machine and extends its German hospitality to visitors with a large reception area and 25-foot-long bar.

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The tool holder lights above the 25-foot-long hospitality bar were a nice touch.

As I toured the facility, I called to mind a number of articles we’ve written about the company’s tooling technology. For example:

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