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On-Machine Probing of My Kind of Workpieces

Leave it to the Germans to develop probing routines to turn a machining center into a beer bottle opener. Gotta love it.

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On-machine probing offers a number of advantages. Probing routines using a touch-trigger probe installed in a machine’s spindle can speed setups by establishing the exact location of a workpiece fixtured on a machine so the part program can be aligned to it. This type of probing can also be applied in a more sophisticated manner for process control, using part measurement data to automatically apply cutter compensations.

We’ve written a number of articles on the topic, and I’ve linked to a few of them below. None of them address the types of workpieces being probed in the video above, however. (Thanks for letting me know about this Production Machining.)

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