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Why a Dual-Column Machining Center?

According to this machine tool supplier, a dual-column or bridge-type machining center is 10 times more thermally stable than a comparable “C” style machine.

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Dual-column machining centers being produced at Okuma’s production facility in Kani, Japan.

According to machine tool distributor Gosiger, a dual-column or bridge-type machining center is 10 times more thermally stable than a comparable “C” style machine. Because of the dual-column design, says the company, heat affects the bridge structure linearly. The machine expands only in a straight line, allowing dimensional changes to be compensated electronically.

The dual-column design also places the spindle nearer to the center of mass of the machine, increasing rigidity. Read more in Gosiger’s article about dual-column machines.

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