8/8/2014 | 2 MINUTE READ

Advanced Technology Drives 40 Years of Manufacturing

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Mazak has been manufacturing machine tools in Florence, Kentucky, for 40 years. The growth and development of the production technology deployed in this plant reflect the most important advances in manufacturing during this span—from enhanced flexible manufacturing systems and multitasking part processing to automation and digital-driven manufacturing.

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Automated machining systems and cells exemplify the evolving role of advanced manufacturing at Mazak’s Florence, Kentucky machine tool factory.

Mazak has been manufacturing machine tools in Florence, Kentucky, for 40 years. The growth and development of the production technology deployed in this plant reflect the most important advances in manufacturing during this span.

One example of the evolving role of advanced manufacturing technology can be seen in how FMS technology has changed and improved, with a corresponding boost in overall factory output.

When the company opened this factory in 1974, its first official machining operations were performed by a flexible machining system (FMS) that incorporated four of its own machining centers and a wire guided vehicle. The launch of this FMS also marked the introduction of the company's production-on-demand concept. Output stood at 20 to 25 machines per month.

In 1990, the company replaced the original FMS with one that consisted of eight H800s, which were then its most advanced HMCs. This FMS incorporated 30 pallets within a Mazak-developed Palletech manufacturing system. Pallets moved on a rail-guided vehicle rather than on a wire-guided one. The capacity of the system was eventually expanded to handle 144 pallets. Capacity reached about 100 machines per month in the factory.

Mazak once again revamped its FMS technology in 2000 by replacing the eight HMCs with four FH-8800 HMCs. The increased power and speed of these machines enabled this FMS to significantly boost output with fewer machines. Total production moved up to 130 machines per month.

In 2006, an Integrex e-1060V Multi-Tasking Machine was added to this FMS. The enlarged system now incorporated the work formally performed on a VTL. The same 144 pallets were now handling large-diameter parts and bringing them to the additional advanced machine for turning operations as well as five-axis milling.

As this FMS was evolving and growing, the company was adding other FMSs and cells elsewhere in the expanding factory areas. For example, its most recent cell processes the company’s machine tool headstocks. Built around a Palletech system, this cell consists of two Horizontal Center Nexus (HNC) 8800 HMCs, an Orbitech 20 large-part machining center and an Integrex e1060V Multi-Tasking Machine.

Today, Mazak’s manufacturing operations occupy an 800,000 square-foot, five-building complex with the capacity to produce 200 machines per month, including many models for export. In addition, it has the resources to design new machines from the ground up.

Read this story for a detailed history of how Mazak has enlarged and improved its Florence, Kentucky, manufacturing operations with advanced technology.

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