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Cryogenic Machining Avoids the White Layer

According to 5ME, a recently discovered benefit of cryogenic machining is that it prevents the formation of an untempered martensitic “white layer” on the machined surface.

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According to 5ME, a recently discovered benefit of cryogenic machining is that it prevents the formation of an untempered martensitic “white layer” on the machined surface. This white layer is detrimental to aircraft parts because it encourages cracks. The discovery means that cryogenic machining can eliminate the acid bath usually used to remove this layer. 

Cryogenic machining is the approach to tool cooling that delivers liquid nitrogen at -321°F through the machine’s spindle or turret and through the cutting tool. The supercooling reduces the rate of tool wear to such an extent that tool life and productivity increases can be obtained simultaneously.

5ME is the newly created company that is able to apply this technology to any builder’s machine tool. Read more here.

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