10/20/2016

Five Tips for Effective Machine Monitoring

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A machine shop’s successful entry into machine monitoring reveals important points about what to do and what to expect.

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Machine monitoring provides a window into the performance of a machine tool.

A machine shop’s successful entry into machine monitoring reveals important points about what to do and what to expect. To encourage and help shops move toward machine monitoring—and more—here are some recommendations and advice, from Richards Industries, a Cincinnati, Ohio, company that has installed a machine-monitoring system to enable its shopfloor personnel to track activities and record the performance of its machine tools.

  1. Have vision and commitment at the top.
  2. Use a pilot program to set the course.
  3. Reinforce shop culture with good communication.
  4. Rally the team around an enthusiastic leader.
  5. Get good data, and act on it appropriately.

For a complete article on these five tips, click here.

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