2/8/2017

Manufacturing News of Note: February 2017

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F. Zimmerman expands U.S. presence, Ganesh appoints new president and other industry news.

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Guests stand in front of Zimmerman’s new Wixom, Michigan, facility during a recent grand opening event. 

German milling machine manufacturer F. Zimmermann GmbH recently hosted a grand opening of its new 13,250-square-foot facility in Wixom, Michigan, dedicated to expanding its activities in North America. The guests, some 40 in all, included employees, business partners, customers and representatives of the county and state.

At the event, shareholder Frieder Gänzle stressed the company’s resolve to be a stronger and more reliable partner for its American customers. “Demand in the American aviation and aerospace industries is continuously growing, and that is also true for the automotive industry,” he said. 

Here is more news to note:

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