2/10/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Manufacturing News of Note: February 2018

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CT scanning for mid-size metal castings, funding secured for an Apprentice Academy in Virginia, and more industry news.

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Jesse Garant Metrology Center (Dearborn, Michigan) is announcing the launch of its new high-energy industrial computed tomography (CT) system. The company says it will be the only private lab in the world to provide this specialized inspection service, transforming the landscape for nondestructive testing and supporting advanced manufacturing.

The center’s capabilities are expected to directly benefit the metalworking industry, allowing for feasible internal inspection of castings made from ferrous and nonferrous materials. This includes the identification of defects like porosity and inclusions, weld inspection, wall thickness analysis, first article inspection, and actual to nominal comparisons for out-of-tolerance features.

The system is the first of its kind that pairs a 3-MeV, cone-beam X-ray source with a large-format, 2,000-square-pixel flat-panel digital detector. It will be able to accommodate rapid inspection of mid-size parts ranging to 44.5 inches in diameter and 63 inches in height. While existing high-energy CT services may take four to 16 hours to complete scans, the new system is able to scan parts in less than an hour, the company says. Read more.

Here is more news to note:  

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