11/22/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

Methods Commits to Medical with New Tech Center

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The company says the facility is well-positioned to fill healthy demand for CNC machining equipment, service and support among medical manufacturers in the southern United States.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Connect at

Methods Machine Tools will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

The opening of a new technology center in Memphis, Tennessee, is not only the latest milestone in a big year for Methods Machine Tools, but also a concrete indication of strong demand for CNC machined medical components.

The company has long serviced medical component manufacturers in the southern United States from another location in Charlottesville, North Carolina. Nonetheless, President and CEO Jerry Rex, who presided over a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new Memphis facility November 14, says it is worth being even closer to a strong base of prospective medical industry customers not only in Memphis, but also in neighboring Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi and the Florida Panhandle.

As for the strength of the medical market and those who serve it, recent survey data from Gardner Intelligence (the research arm of Modern Machine Shop publisher Gardner Business Media) show that medical manufacturers have experienced strong growth in new orders, production and supplier deliveries. Overall, this data suggest that medical manufacturers are highly likely to close out 2018 in very good condition.   

Methods, of course, serves more than just medical manufacturers, and the company’s experience this year—its 60th anniversary—also evidences a strong manufacturing market in general. Headquartered in Sudbury, Massachusetts, the company has expanded its already expansive product line, which ranges from vertical and horizontal machining centers (VMCs and HMCs) to multi-axis turn-mills to EDMs. Thanks to new partnerships, the line now includes EDM drilling machines from Ocean Technologies; HMCs and boring mills from Niigata; and Swiss-type lathes from Tornos.

Perhaps just as importantly, and just as indicative of broader trends, the company particularly emphasizes the automation systems that surround and augment these machines. One notable example of integrated automation can be seen in the picture gallery above. This FANUC Robodrill VMC features not only a two-axis worktable from Haeberle, but also a workpiece storage magazine from the same manufacturer and a FANUC robotic arm to transition parts from magazine to machine. As such, the system is designed to drop into place as a compact, efficient means of automating five-axis machining of small to medium lot sizes. Representatives noted that Methods also stands ready to help with automation beyond machine tending, particularly tedious, time-consuming tasks like deburring.

RELATED CONTENT

  • A Big-Picture View of Micromachining

     Matrix Tooling makes injection molds for components that have features you cannot see.

  • Passivation of Stainless Steel Parts: The Recipe for Success

    Passivation—the process for making stainless steel parts more corrosion-resistant—is affected by how well the part is cleaned. It’s also affected by the choice of acid. Nitric or citric?

  • Bringing It All Together

    Shops that serve medical instrument and implant manufacturers face special challenges. Their customers typically want precisely machined parts plus the extras such as finishing, marking, assembly and expert handling of the regulatory paperwork. That’s why this shop is focused on providing more than just the machining.

Related Topics

Resources