12/15/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

News of Note: December 2018

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

ORNL appoints new leadership, Ingersoll remains with current owners, DMG MORI expands and other industry news. 

Thomas Kurfess and Scott Smith are joining the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support its research in advanced manufacturing. Their respective expertise in control systems and machine tooling expands the capabilities of the department’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL; their experience with industry, academia and the public sector is expected to enhance lab partnerships and promote adoption of new technologies by U.S. manufacturers.

“ORNL has been at the forefront of rapid advances in manufacturing technology, and Drs. Kurfess and Smith will lead critical programs in advanced manufacturing, automation and robotics that support the lab’s mission of delivering scientific and technical solutions to national challenges,” says ORNL Director Thomas Zacharia. Read More

Here is more news of note: 

Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Modern Machine Shop in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • The Challenges of Machining Glass-Filled Plastics

    Plastics reinforced with glass present more machining variables to manage than conventional metals. This shop has developed a process to overcome those challenges and has become more adroit at short-run work along the way.

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

  • An Overview Of 3 + 2 Machining

    You don't have to use all five axes of a five-axis machine at the same time to get great benefits. Here's what 3 + 2 can do for you.

Resources