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Okuma Supports Aerospace Excellence

The new Aerospace Center of Excellence at Okuma America enables manufacturers to visit, test equipment, confer with experts and learn about CNC machines that are custom-designed for aerospace industry applications.

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Okuma has invested in nine machines worth $6.5 million to fill the 10,000 square-foot space, designed for aerospace manufacturers to test the latest CNC machining processes.

A recent visit with Okuma America at U.S. headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina, allowed me to take a tour of the company’s new Aerospace Center of Excellence. Okuma has invested in nine machines worth $6.5 million to fill the 10,000 square-foot space. This space enables aerospace manufacturers to test cuts, check accuracies, determine effectiveness and prove out the latest Okuma CNC machining processes.

The center also includes a fully operational metrology room with CMM equipment and other quality measurement devices, as well as a conference room for group discussions. Visitors also have access to the Partners in THINC facility, housing an additional 16 machines ranging from entry-level CNC lathes to machining centers and grinders.

Aerospace manufacturers are invited to contact Okuma America to schedule a visit to the new center, and to collaborate with its experienced engineers in discovering the most accurate and productive means of machining the next generation of aerospace components. Watch the video tour of the new Aerospace Center of Excellence. 

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