3/27/2015 | 1 MINUTE READ

Secrets to the Art of Hand Scraping

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Hand scraping of mating surfaces on a machine tool enables the surfaces to be flatter, more accurately aligned, longer wearing and freer to glide across one another. No automated or mechanical operation can match these benefits. Machine builder Okuma explains how this seeming paradox is true.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Connect at

Okuma America will be exhibiting new technology at IMTS 2020 in Chicago this September.

Plan to meet up with their team or get registered here!

Watch this video for a demo of the hand scraping process, and find a link below to a white paper on the topic.

Hand scraping of mating surfaces on a machine tool enables the surfaces to be flatter, more accurately aligned, longer wearing and freer to glide across one another. No automated or mechanical operation can match these benefits. Machine builder Okuma has issued a white paper detailing the benefits of hand scraping, at technique it applies to all of its machines.

The company contends that hand scraping maintains high levels of CNC machining accuracy and reduces wear and tear, resulting in a long, stable and productive life for the machine. This manual process ensures that tight tolerances are consistently maintained and that precision CNC machining performance is sustained for years, therefore yielding the lowest cost-per-part, the company says. 

In a nutshell, the hand-scraping difference accounts for four main benefits.

  • Accuracy - Scraping is done to align components within millionths of an inch, allowing for consistently-held, tight tolerances.
  • Flatness - Contact points prevent rocking, add balance when tightening, and allow for true flatness in parts.
  • Oil Pockets - Oil on the surface allows gliding motion.
  • Appearance - The finishing touch of scraping is aesthetic. Parts are “design scraped” to achieve an attractive textured finish.

To download a copy of the white paper, click here.

 

�

RELATED CONTENT

  • When Spindle Speed is a Constraint

    Though it won’t replace high speed machining, Boeing sees “low speed machining” as a viable supplement to higher-rpm machines. Using new tools and techniques, a shop’s lower-rpm machining centers can realize much more of their potential productivity in milling aluminum aircraft parts.

  • How One Shop Machines Advanced Ceramics

    Years of trial and error combined with the appropriate machining technology allow this company to produce custom parts made of alumina, zirconia, boron nitride and other advanced ceramic materials. One example of key machining technology is a five-axis machining center used exclusively to produce the complex, tightly toleranced geometry that fire-hardened workpieces require.

  • Four Types Of Five-Axis Machining Centers

    Different machines offer different approaches to rotary travel, and each design has its own strengths. Here's how they compare.

Resources