9/9/2011 | 1 MINUTE READ

See a Quick Way to Deburr Holes in Contoured Surfaces

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This video shows a device that enables machine tools to quickly deburr both sides of through holes in elliptical and contoured surfaces.

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The video above shows how COFA devices from Heule Tool enable machine tools to quickly and effectively deburr both sides of through holes drilled in elliptical and contoured surfaces.
 
As the rotating tool is fed into the hole, the front cutting edge deburrs the top of the hole and the blade rocks upward. The action of the blade cuts a smooth, tapered edge break from 0.010 to 0.030 inch, depending on the tool’s diameter.
 
While the blade is in the hole, only the ground and polished non-cutting ball touches the wall surface protecting the workpiece from damage while the tool is fed through the part. There is no need to stop or reverse the spindle. When the blade reaches the bottom of the part, its blade springs back into cutting position and the back cutting edge deburrs the bottom of the hole as the tool is withdrawn. Once the blade is back inside the hole, the tool can be rapidly removed and moved to the next hole.

These universal deburring tools use a proprietary TiN-coated carbide blade that is said to achieve fast feeds and speeds and provide long tool life. COFA tools are available sizes ranging from 0.157 to 1.614 inch (4 to 41 mm). A cassette option is available for larger holes.

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