Tradeshow Tuesday: Targeting Moldmakers in Product Descriptions

Being mindful of the audience that will read a product and adding language to it that illustrates the product’s relevance to that audience will help a product achieve maximum visibility and persuasiveness.

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Moving into the second week of January, I cannot stress enough that it is not too early to begin planning for NPE, Amerimold and IMTS. Preparation is the key to taking full advantage of the many opportunities ahead. While its still early in the year, I thought I would put out a blog post on product submissions for tradeshows. For this post, I’d like to address all moldmakers and technology suppliers. My thoughts here are for those of you who contribute material to MMT’s product section.

As the managing editor for MMT, I oversee products and news for the brand. Something I’ve noticed in editing this material is how infrequently product submissions include clear language that explains why a moldmaker (and not just any machinist or metalworking professional) would consider investing in the product.

Sounds odd, right? I’m not saying that it doesn’t happen. Submission material occasionally includes such a description, and some products, because of what they are, clearly demonstrate their value to a mold shop. Other product submissions include a few words here and there about moldmaking applications (or may just include the word “mold” somewhere in the text), but a fair portion of them have no language in them that help the reader understand why a given item is suitable for the moldmaking niche of the metalworking world.

So, why does that happen? My guess is that for many groups, the same spot of PR is sent to a variety of places. As the essential specs of a product don’t generally change across the venues where a product description might appear, companies use the same material for a variety of outlets, which streamlines the writing and boosting efficiency and process simplicity. In major show years, groups planning to show the same thing at each show may use one description for all three shows for the same reason.

This is a critical misstep! It is a wasted opportunity not adding a few words to a product description that speak directly to the moldmaker reading your product in MMT. Just because a product has applications in a variety of industries does not mean that companies should use the same language in their efforts to appeal to all the prospective buyers in those industries. Matching the value of a product to the needs of a specific industry makes it easier for members in that industry to perceive the product’s value.

Matching the value of a product to the needs of a specific industry makes it easier for members in that industry to perceive the product’s value.

Making a little bit of effort to include language that targets moldmakers will demonstrate that you understand their profession, that you understand their products-related needs and that you are invested in providing effective solutions to those needs.This will give you credibility. An inch of extra text on paper could boost your bottom line by miles.

Why am I suggesting this targeted approach in crafting your product material? MoldMaking Technology wants to distribute niche-industry specific content that is targeted to moldmakers, and I want to help your material do the best that it can to reach prospective buyers.

Now, as you assemble products for the upcoming shows, consider adding one or two sentences that highlight how the product is appropriate for moldmakers. It is absolutely worth the effort.

As you assemble products for the upcoming shows, consider adding one or two sentences that highlight how the product is appropriate for moldmakers.

If you have any questions about product submissions at tradeshows or about the products section in the print magazine or online, you can reach out to me at kcornelissen@moldmakingtechnology.com