11/8/2018

Video: Chipbreakers Are Not All the Same—How to Break Chips Effectively

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Different chipbreakers are engineered for different parameters. Machining footage shows the difference in effectiveness between chipbreakers used in the right and the wrong applications.

Chipbreakers are a frequently misunderstood aspect of cutting tools. Many assume a chipbreaker is a chipbreaker, and that they all work the same. In fact, different chipbreaker designs are engineered for different applications. They lose their effectiveness outside the parameters for which they were intended.

I had a chance to talk about this at TechSolve, the machining consulting firm based in Cincinnati, Ohio. We filmed some machining passes there to show the difference in effectiveness between chipbreakers used in the right and the wrong applications.

Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Modern Machine Shop in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Taking The Fear Out Of Hard Turning

    To make the transition to hard turning, you'll need to switch from carbide to CBN inserts, but that is easier (and more economical) than you might think. It's making the jump to much higher surface speeds that might scare you off. It needn't. Here's why.

  • Successful Application Of Ceramic Inserts

    Applying ceramic inserts is not a simple substitution of one cutting tool material for another. There are significant process considerations that shops should examine carefully in order to realize performance and tool life expectations from ceramic inserts. Here's a look at some of the ways they are used.

  • Rolling Threads Has Advantages

    With macros and canned cycles resident in the CNC on most contemporary turning centers, single point turning of OD threads can seem like almost a default process decision. However, for numerous applications, OD thread rolling has inherent advantages as an alternative to cutting threads.

Resources