3/23/2015

Video: Compensating for a Bad Center Hole

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Center hole drilled off-center? A compensating live center can save parts from becoming scrap.

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A center hole that is drilled even slightly off-center can lead to a non-concentric workpiece. If no adjustments are made and the runout is too much, that workpiece ultimately ends up as scrap. While a bad center hole may be only an occasional problem, it can be fairly simple to correct with the use of a compensating live center.

The video above from Riten Industries demonstrates how its Adjusta-Point live center is able to offset a shaft’s deviation by means of external adjusting screws. The adjustment process is similar to indicating a part using a four-jaw chuck, and it takes only a few minutes to bring the shaft back within acceptable grinding standards.


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