1/3/2019

Video: Emotional Intelligence in Action at Westminster Tool

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A companion to the recent Modern Machine Shop cover story on a moldmaker’s commitment to emotional intelligence, here is a look at the culture change at this shop through the words and perspectives of team members.

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Westminster Tool used to have a skilled labor problem, but it no longer does. In the past, this moldmaker and contract manufacturer in Plainfield, Connecticut, struggled to find skilled employees such as toolmakers. Now, it has a surplus: a waiting list of more than a dozen prospective employees who have been vetted according to the shop’s needs. What made this change possible was a dramatic culture shift deliberately undertaken by owner and founder Ray Coombs, allowing the shop to change what it looks for in employees. By equipping the entire staff with training in emotional intelligence, Westminster was able to implement a system of rapid on-the-job learning enabling employees without experience in metalworking and moldmaking to acquire that experience quickly.

I wrote an article detailing Westminster’s aims, philosophy and transition, and this video is a companion to that piece—offering a taste of the company’s culture through the words and perspectives of some of its team members. Joining me in this video is Christina Fuges of MoldMaking Technology, with videography and video production by Gardner Business Media’s Austin Grogan.

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