3/16/2015

Video: Robot Changes Vise Jaws for Continuous Machining

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If a robot can load and unload parts, why can’t it do the same for workholding? Here is video of a robot changing the vise jaws so the same machining center can run different operations in unattended machining.

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If a robot can load and unload parts, why can’t it do the same for workholding? VersaBuilt creates robot systems in which the vise jaws that hold a given part inside the machining center also serve as the grippers enabling the robot to load and unload that part. Changing vise jaws as needed enables the robot to shift parts from operation to operation. If there are different jaws on the shelf for different part numbers, then this same jaw change can let the robot switch seamlessly from job to job.

VersaBuilt filmed this video of continuous unattended 3-op machining on a VMC using this system, with the robot switching jaws for the different operations.

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