6/25/2014

Video: World’s Largest Additive Metal Manufacturing Plant

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GE Aviation facility in Italy will have capacity for 60 machines making metal production parts through additive manufacturing.

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Avio Aero, a GE Aviation business, says its new 2,400-square-meter facility in Cameri, Italy will have the capacity for 60 machines making metal production parts through additive manufacturing. Filling that capacity would make this facility the largest additive metal manufacturing plant in the world. The video above describes the facility, as well as the advantage GE Aviation sees in additive production—advantages that include significant savings in time, material, energy, emissions and part weight. As the video shows, additive manufacturing allows what was once would have been an assembly of five pieces to be replaced by a single intricate component grown in an additive cycle.

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