1/10/2014

What’s Best for Boring Titanium?

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In a joint research effort, Kaiser Precision Tooling and Blaser Swisslube searched for a combination of metalworking fluid and indexable insert that show the best results when boring titanium. The results underscore the importance of controlling vibration, friction and heat.

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In a joint research project, Kaiser Precision Tooling and Blaser Swisslube searched for the combination of metalworking fluid and indexable insert that showed the best results when boring titanium. The results underscore the importance of controlling vibration, friction and heat.

The companies tested five metalworking fluids and several indexable insert grades from competing suppliers. All of the inserts tested were recommended for titanium applications. Findings showed that certain inserts lasted 15 times longer than others, depending on the choice of metalworking fluid. With the same metalworking fluid, certain inserts lasted 20 times longer than others.

Overall, the best combination for boring titanium proved to be the Kaiser 655.389 insert (TC11, AlCrN coating, 0.016-inch nose radius) with Blaser’s B-Cool 755 coolant.

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