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You Are Already Paying for Training

Training saves cost in the form of higher efficiency and reduced rework. It’s just that the costs of not training are difficult to quantify, affecting the perception of training’s ROI.
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Paulson Training Programs provides training content and services for the plastics industry, but much of what it has to say in this knowledge center is relevant to CNC machining facilities as well. The company points out that there is a bias among manufacturers toward investing in machines rather than investing in employee training. Why? One reason is the possibility that the trained employee might leave. However, another reason is the fact that the ROI for new equipment purchases is much easier to calculate. The costs of not training are hard to see. However, as Paulson points out, the facility that is not paying for training is probably paying for the lack of training, because those costs are very real.

For example, how much income is lost by accepting inefficient production as normal? Or by frequently scrapping parts or making corrections because of recurring mistakes? Paulson created these charts to illustrate the cost of unnecessary cycle time, downtime and rejects (again, tailored to the plastics industry, but still relevant). These are the ongoing costs that an investment in training can overcome.

For more about training as it relates to CNC machining facilities, visit our Training & Personnel Zone. Also, read this article about a job shop that reduced remachining, rework and rejects by significantly increasing its attention to training.