Machining Presentations

Investing in the Future

To nurture the vibrant aerospace industry, many investments must be made. Likewise, machine tool builders must invest in the success of customers in several categories. These include: academia, research & development, next-generation end-user technology, environmental responsibility, manufacturing facility development, and global financial concerns that can reduce sensitivity to fluctuating currencies. In many cases, investment is made through shared partnerships with customers that result in either risk or reward for both parties. In this presetation, Dr. Masahiko Mori explores these varying investments from several perspectives, as relates to the aerospace manufacturing industry.
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Next Generation Machining

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When it comes to the trends of the manufacturing industry, market leaders have a responsibility to be perceptive and forward thinking. In terms of competence - R & D and labor needs are more important than ever. Increased competence provides opportunities to develop superior tools and value added manufacturing methods driving the industry into the future. The more advanced manufacturing becomes the harder it is for the individual companies to keep all competencies in house. This opens up new ways of partnerships and cooperation between manufacturers, tool makers, machine makers and research centers. It also sets the agenda of future competence needs, training and recruitment.
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New Tools, Techniques, and Technologies

Professor Smith introduces, examines, and evaluates core manufacturing technology. He describes the vast opportunities there are for changing established manufacturing methods. He gives a number of examples of how a small idea or invention has the potential to create a paradigm shift in the way structural aircraft parts are made.
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Enabling New Production Strategies with Multi-Task Solutions

In spite of much hype over innovation, it can be demonstrated that improvements in the productivity of metal cutting have averaged only 1.5% per year over the last 200 years, and accelerated to only 3.2% over the last 30 years. However, we are enjoying disruptive innovations, but they are realized in new manufacturing strategies which enable new value propositions and business plans rather than through simple cutting speeds. In this presentation, examples are shown in which complex components are produced in less time, with fewer operations, little operator intervention, and reduced carbon footprint, largely with conventional cutting tools. In one case, gears are blanked, hobbed, surface hardened, and finish ground in a single operation. In another, aerospace structural components are produced with programmable fixtures which are common to many parts. In the last example, a fan-stage blade is pinch milled between the equal and opposite cutting forces of two tools.
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Enabling Tomorrow's Aerospace Technology Today

An important part of manufacturing is innovation which continues to advance manufacturing processes. A great deal of time and effort is spent on developing innovative technologies which can have a big impact on a business' bottom line. Yet today, much of this technology remains untapped. If implemented properly, this cutting edge technology can greatly increase throughput when enabled. In many cases, though, this means more than just turning on an option or feature in the CNC. This presentation discusses how technology, expertise and partnerships play a significant role in the implementation of advanced aerospace CNC technology available today. Examples of innovations that can improve machine tool performance and significantly reduce costs while increasing accuracy and surface finish include advanced high speed smoothing functions, vector programming and volumetric compensation. An example of an installed application is provided which demonstrates how a partnership of experts can work together to enable a new manufacturing process.
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Metrology-Enabled Airfoil Manufacturing

Jet engine manufacturers face continual pressure to improve the performance and cost-effectiveness of their products. There is a focus on achieving ever tighter tolerances on complex airfoils and integrated blade rotors (blisks) through a controlled manufacturing process which eliminates manual intervention in finishing. In order to produce consistently smooth blended surfaces; accurate, high density surface data is required throughout the machining, gauging and subsequent verification stages. This presentation explainshow new measurement technologies are emerging to make an automated metrology-enabled manufacturing approach more viable.
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The Importance of Volumetric Machine Tool Accuracy in Making Precision Aerospace Parts

Machine tool accuracy is not linear. It is volumetric. Traditionally, manufacturers have ensured accuracy of parts by calibrating just the linear motion of their machine tools. The problem: When making three-dimensional parts, knowing a machine’s one-dimensional accuracy ignores squareness, straightness, angular, and non-rigid body errors, which are the largest contributors to positioning inaccuracies. Part quality is at risk if a machining center cannot hold tolerances uniformly throughout its entire working envelope. This makes volumetric accuracy a key indicator of a machine’s capability in high precision applications. This presentation details the machine tool design and construction characteristics required to ensure optimum volumetric accuracy, and the instruments used to verify and measure volumetric accuracy.
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High Performance Machining of Titanium

As we all know, titanium is a difficult material to machine. So, how can we create a process for machining it that would be called ‘high performance’? First, we need to define ‘performance’, since in a production world, making a part faster is not the only consideration but also making it for less cost.  This presentation reviews the key characteristics of this material that make it difficult to machine, the requirements for a titanium machining process, the cost components and some of the ways to measure or monitor that process for troubleshooting and process improvements.
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Cryogenic Super Cooling for Aerospace Machining

Learn to apply, state-of-the-art, Cryogenic super cooling technology through-the-tool to dramatically increase production rates and increase tool life (up to 10x). The presentation begins with an overview of the unique design characteristics enabling minimum quantities of liquid nitrogen to be utilized through-the-spindle to super cool the tool providing unprecedented productivity levels. Increased machining speeds and tool life can be realized in a variety of difficult to machine materials.
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MACHINING: A Dynamic Future

Traditional methods of determining speeds and feeds have largely ignored the dynamic aspects of machining and are often based upon other factors, some subjective. Consequently users can’t be certain of running at optimum parameters. This becomes even more acute as machining technology advances and provides the user a wider range of parameters to select from. Innovation is pushing the physics envelope so cut power and dynamic deflection become critical. This presentation documents how machining dynamics solutions have evolved to create a simple objective, scientific approach for taking any guesswork out of choosing optimum machining parameters. The presenter challenge the machining and machine tool industry to embrace the use of predictive, adaptive, and optimization systems and make them part of their machining culture.
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The Influence of High Pressure Coolant on Process Optimization in Heat Resistant Super Alloys (HRSA)

Harnessing high pressure coolant capabilities in HRSA machining can have a dramatic effect on productivity and process optimization in aerospace component manufacturing. High pressure coolant has seen tool life improvements of up to 50% in difficult alloys. By creating a laminar flow at the cutting edge with pre-directed nozzles, chip control is improved substantially. This can be advantageous in several applications by reducing the length of contact between chip and insert and consequently, the heat generated. Through program optimization of modern techniques, tool life and productivity will be greatly improved. This affects both machining security, through less risk of chip entanglement, machine stoppage to clear chips and the amount of operator supervision needed, ultimately leading to more competitive manufacturing.
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