7/24/2018

Amada Miyachi America Expands Detroit Technical Center

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Amada Miyachi America’s expanded Detroit technical center features new laboratory space  for applications development in welding, marking, ablation, scribing and texturing of metals and plastics.

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Amada Miyachi America recently expanded and enhanced its Detroit technical center. The updated facility now features 5,500 square feet of laboratory space devoted to application development services for welding, marking, ablation, scribing and texturing of metals and plastics. Also on site is an expanded metallurgical lab for examining laser or resistance welds to analyze weld penetration and joint quality.

The company’s application experts are on-hand to work with customers to develop joining or marking processes, especially for medical, aerospace, automotive, electric vehicle battery production and joining of cells. The expanded lab facility offers expertise and access to equipment so that customers do not have to tie up their existing production facilities.

The center is headed by senior applications engineer Wes Buckley, who has 38 years of process experience in lasers and has worked at the existing laboratory for more than a decade. He is joined by three technical experts who have worked closely with major automotive, medical and aerospace companies. Recent projects include systems with galvo delivery for joining automotive battery cells for the electric vehicle market.

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