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9/27/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

BeAM Applying CGTech's AM Verification Technology

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BeAM, a manufacturer of powder-based directed energy deposition (DED) technology based in Cincinnati, Ohio, is partnering with CGTech to use its Vericut toolpath-simulation software’s Additive module in its equipment.

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BeAM, a manufacturer of powder-based directed energy deposition (DED) technology based in Cincinnati, Ohio, is partnering with CGTech to use its Vericut toolpath simulation software’s Additive module on its equipment.

BeAM’s additive machines utilize a high-powered laser and coaxial deposition nozzle to apply highly accurate, three-dimensional layers of aerospace grade materials like titanium, Inconel, stainless steels and more. Its DED machines can be used to repair parts like turbine blades and fuel nozzles, add features to existing geometries, and build near-net shapes with quality surfaces. The company’s machines also use five-axis technology, enabling users to take design freedom in ever more complex directions.

With the ability to create previously-unachievable shapes, visualization of these shapes has become increasingly challenging, prompting the company to reach out to toolpath simulation provider CGTech for help with verifying the millions of lines of code needed to drive 3D printers.

Based in Irvine, California, CGTech has long been a supplier of toolpath simulation and optimization software, and the Vericut Additive module is the latest in a series of software tools designed to make manufacturers more efficient and their equipment safer.

“Vericut Additive uses a digital twin of the workpiece and machine tool to simulate 3D printing and hybrid processes,” says CGTech Product Manager Gene Granata. “This is especially important with high-speed five-axis machine tools like BeAM’s, due to the extreme part complexity and fast build rates made possible by their equipment.”

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