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12/19/2016

Camfil APC Appoints Vice President for Americas

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Most recently, Graeme Bell was vice president of Camfil APC Europe.

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Camfil Air Pollution Control (APC) has appointed Graeme Bell to the position of Vice President of Camfil APC Americas. He will relocate from Europe to Camfil APC corporate headquarters in Jonesboro, Arkansas, where he will hold full responsibility for the manufacturing, technical and training facility there as well as North and South American sales operations for the company’s dust, mist and fume collection products. Mr. Bell will report to Christian Debus, global executive vice president.

In the four years since Mr. Bell joined the company, the company has promoted him to various sales and management posts in Europe. Most recently he served as vice president of Camfil APC Europe, where he handled U.K., German and Czech operations including manufacturing sites as well as full strategic growth responsibility for Europe. 

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