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12/30/2016

Nikon Metrology Adds Mid-Atlantic Distributor

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Bradford Instrument & Gage will offer the full line of Nikon’s metrology equipment as well as X-ray and CT scanning products.

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Nikon Metrology (Brighton, Michigan) has announced a distributor partnership with Bradford Instrument & Gage (Wilmington, Delaware). The agreement will enable Bradford to distribute Nikon’s quality and metrology products to customers in the Mid-Atlantic United States region, encompassing Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Tony Scirpo, Nikon business solutions manager for the region, says that Bradford will supply Nikon’s multi-sensor coordinate measuring machines (CMMs), optical vision systems and laser scanners, which can be retrofitted to new and existing CMMs and articulating arms. In addition to offering the full line of metrology products, Bradford will also distribute X-ray and CT scanning equipment.

“We like the technology that Nikon Metrology offers, especially in regards to laser scanners. Non-contact laser scanning is the next evolution in probing methods, and Nikon is ahead of the curve,” says Stuart Collins, pesident of Bradford Instrument & Gage.

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