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11/29/2018

Renishaw and Sandvik Collaborate to Advance Metal AM

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Renishaw has initiated a collaboration with Sandvik Additive Manufacturing to supply the company with high productivity multi-laser RenAM 500Q systems.

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To strengthen the metal additive manufacturing (AM) industry, global engineering company Renishaw has initiated a collaboration with Sandvik Additive Manufacturing to supply the company with high productivity multi-laser RenAM 500Q systems, which will substantially increase Sandvik’s printing capacity.

This is one of the largest installations to date of Renishaw’s latest AM system, the RenAM 500Q. The system features 500 W quad lasers in the most commonly used platform size, enabling a radical increase in productivity, without compromising quality.

Working with ongoing support from Renishaw, the investment will complement Sandvik’s existing printing technologies and strengthen its position in the growing AM market. The two companies also intend to collaborate in areas like materials development, AM process technologies and post-processing.

Sandvik has recently initiated extensive investments in a new plant for manufacturing of titanium and nickel powders for AM. The company says the investment will complement Sandvik’s existing Osprey powder offering, to include virtually all alloy groups of relevance today.

For more information on Renishaw’s additive manufacturing products and services, visit https://www.renishaw.com/additive

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