} Toyoda to Host Aerospace Machining Lunch & Learn with Iscar, Mastercam | Modern Machine Shop
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Toyoda to Host Aerospace Machining Lunch & Learn with Iscar, Mastercam

The event will include educational seminars and machine demonstrations.

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Toyoda is hosting the Aerospace Industry Solutions Lunch & Learn December 8, 2016, at its Placentia, California, Tech Center along with tooling manufacturer Iscar (Arlington, Texas) and CAD/CAM software developer CNC Software Inc. (Tolland, Connecticut), maker of Mastercam. The event will focus on machining processes for strong and lightweight materials that accommodate the standards in making efficient and economical aerospace components. Members of the three companies will be on site running live machining demonstrations and leading seminar sessions.

The seminars include:

  • Iscar Tool Advisor. In this seminar, members of Iscar will talk about the Iscar Tool Advisor (ITS) software, which enables users to select the most effective tool for the job by sifting through factors such as cutting conditions, machine power, metal removal rate and cutting.
  • Mastercam Dynamic Motion Tool Paths. In this seminar, members of CNC Software Inc. will present this software feature’s capacity for extending tool and equipment life through efficient machining strategies such as smoother motion and fewer toolpath reversals.

Those interested in attending can register at toyoda.com. 

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