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3/2/2018

Toyoda to Host Seminar at YG-1's North Carolina Facility

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The lunch learning seminar will focus on prolonging tool life and maintaining accuracy when machining tough metals using YG-1’s cutting tools and Toyoda’s Stealth 1165 VMC. 

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JTEKT Toyoda Americas (Arlington Heights, Illinois) will hold a lunch learning seminar at YG-1’s Cutting Tools Tech Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The event March 22, 2018, will compare modern milling techniques to age-old methods of metal removal on 15-4pm and titanium.

YG-1’s Charlotte location is home to Toyoda’s Stealth 1165 C-frame VMC for research and learning. YG-1’s engineers have tested solid carbide and high strength steel (HSS) cutting tools from its latest line to develop performance processes that prolong tool life and maintain accuracy in machining tough metals. 

To register and learn about the featured processes, visit info.toyoda.com/yg1millingstrategies.

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