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Verisurf Appoints New Director of Sales, Americas

Pat Bass brings 18 years of experience in aerospace manufacturing to his new role, where he will lead regional sales managers and sales engineers in North, Central and South America. 

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Verisurf Software has appointed Pat Bass to the position of Director of Sales for the Americas. In this new role, Bass will lead veteran regional sales managers and sales engineers in North, Central and South America.

Mr. Bass began his 18-year aerospace manufacturing career managing and leading tool engineers, quality engineers, inspection technicians and tool-building tradespeople at McDonnell Douglas, Northrop Grumman and Boeing. He then moved into sales, taking with him practical experience in manufacturing and metrology. Before joining Verisurf in 2015, he served as National Sales Manager for Hexagon Metrology Services Inc. and as Regional Sales Manager for Leica Geosystems.

“I am thrilled to lead the Verisurf sales team in the Americas,” Mr. Bass says. “I have great respect for the power of Verisurf Software and the care our sales team and application engineers provide to customers.”

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