• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
4/19/2010

Waste Disposal Service Helps EDM, Waterjet Users Avoid Liability

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

As the sheer volume of industrial byproducts and waterborn waste from EDM, waterjet and other processes has increased in recent years, so have the costs—and liabilities—associated with its disposal, according to ABA Water Systems (Plainview, Minnesota). Thus, it’s even more important for manufacturers to ask any provider of deionized resin regeneration services whether it is licensed to dispose of the range of materials that are trapped in the resin during water filtering and demineralizing processes.ABA, which provides products and services for a range of water purification applications, was recently licensed for the 16th year in a row by state and federal agencies to treat and dispose of these wastes. “Because we’re licensed, we can accept the customer’s exhausted resin for treatment, regenerate the resin and then dispose of the controlled-substance-laced wastes that could otherwise be forced on the manufacturing operation,” says Neil Weaver, company president. “We make it easier to avoid the potential liability of noncompliance.”Mr.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

As the sheer volume of industrial byproducts and waterborn waste from EDM, waterjet and other processes has increased in recent years, so have the costs—and liabilities—associated with its disposal, according to ABA Water Systems (Plainview, Minnesota). Thus, it’s even more important for manufacturers to ask any provider of deionized resin regeneration services whether it is licensed to dispose of the range of materials that are trapped in the resin during water filtering and demineralizing processes.

ABA, which provides products and services for a range of water purification applications, was recently licensed for the 16th year in a row by state and federal agencies to treat and dispose of these wastes. “Because we’re licensed, we can accept the customer’s exhausted resin for treatment, regenerate the resin and then dispose of the controlled-substance-laced wastes that could otherwise be forced on the manufacturing operation,” says Neil Weaver, company president. “We make it easier to avoid the potential liability of noncompliance.”

Mr. Weaver adds that in addition to helping customers avoid liability problems, the company’s regeneration process returns resin that performs as well as or better than the virgin resin at a lower cost. 

Resources