10/3/2017

3D Printer’s Carbon Fiber-Filled Nylon Produces Stronger Parts

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Fabtech 2017: Markforged’s X3 3D printer uses Onyx, a high-temperature capable, carbon fiber-filled nylon, to print engineering-grade thermoplastic fiber parts.

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Markforged’s X3 3D printer uses Onyx, a high-temperature capable, carbon fiber-filled nylon, to print engineering-grade thermoplastic fiber parts.

The company’s X5 printer adds the ability to reinforce an Onyx part with a strand of continuous fiberglass, making it stronger and stiffer than traditional plastics, the company says.

The X7, previously known as the Mark X, remains the company’s flagship continuous carbon fiber industrial printer platform, yielding parts many times stronger than ABS, . It has in-part laser inspection for reliable quality control.

All Markforged printers share a software ecosystem built on a cloud-based platform designed to protect intellectual property.

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