| 1 MINUTE READ

3D Printers Suit High-Temperature Thermoplastics Applications

IMTS 2018: Updates to the A2V4 and A4V4 3D printers, designed by 3ntr and distributed by Plural Additive Manufacturing, include print beds that withstand temperatures as high as 160°C and build chambers as high as 90°C.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Updates to the A2V4 and A4V4 3D printers, designed by 3ntr and distributed by Plural Additive Manufacturing, include print beds that withstand temperatures as high as 160°C and build chambers as high as 90°C to support high-temperature thermoplastics applications. Their extruder systems feature 450°C extruder heads, improving temperature control, while the volume of the liquid coolant systems has been doubled. 

The printers also feature the Diamond Tray, a reusable carbon-fiber build plate with a temperature-sensitive, permanent adhesive layer that includes Ultem PEI. The tray holds models tightly at build chamber temperatures without clips, hairspray or tape, and enables quicker removal of models from the print bed.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Metal AM in a Machine Shop? Ask the Marines

    A hybrid system combining metal 3D printing with machining gives the Marine Corps perhaps its most effective resource yet for obtaining needed hardware in the field. It also offers an extreme version of the experience a machine shop might have in adding metal AM to its capabilities.

  • Growing Closer: Machine Shops and 3D Printing for Production

    Machining a large 3D-printed part for aerospace composite tooling is fundamentally different than manufacturing the part traditionally. Baker Industries knows this first-hand.

  • Inside Oak Ridge’s 3D-Printed Machine Tool Moonshot

    The widespread outsourcing of large machine castings led a collaborative team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to tackle the machine tool supply chain. The first step? 3D print the largest cast component.