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11/29/2017

90-Line-D Built-In Detector Corrects Misalignment Errors

Originally titled 'Built-In Detector Corrects Misalignment Errors'
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Pinpoint Laser Systems’ 90-Line-D is for monitoring and detecting misalignment and other errors in machinery and equipment and aligning and checking planar squareness and parallelism on assemblies, machinery, and equipment.

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Pinpoint Laser Systems’ 90-Line-D is for monitoring and detecting misalignment and other errors in machinery and equipment. The 90-Line-D is for aligning and checking planar squareness and parallelism on assemblies, machinery, and equipment. It’s compact, portable, and available in a wired and wireless version for factory floors and for all industrial applications, the company says.

Pentaprism, for bending the laser 90 degrees, redirects an incoming laser beam to a new “square” laser reference line. By rotating the front nosepiece of the 90-Line-D this laser reference line will form a laser plane for additional alignment and measurements. According to the company, a fine adjust feature is included to help direct the laser beam.

A built-in detector monitors the incoming laser beam and actively corrects for any misalignments or small errors. The 90-Line-D is machined from a solid block of aluminum with a durable anodized finish, stainless steel components, and internal glass optics, the company says.

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